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The Kinesiology department at CSUB offers a friendly, supportive, and encouraging environment.  Our experienced faculty members get to know their students personally and are dedicated to helping them succeed.

Announcement
Staff and faculty are scheduled to work remotely for fall 2020 and spring 2021 semester.  To insure a prompt response, the best way to contact your instructor is via email.  Additional contact information for instructors can be found in the campus directory.

Department Chair

Kris Grappendorf
Kris Grappendorf
Department Chair
Phone 661-654-2378
Fax 661-654-2067
E-mail kgrappendorf@csub.edu
Website www.csub.edu/sse/kine
Office EDUC 140

More Information

Education:

M.A.       Exercise Science, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Omaha, NE (1996)
B.S.       Physical Education (K-12 Teaching Certificate), Dana College, Blair, NE (1993)

Teaching:

KINE 1018:  Lifetime Fitness
KINE 2000:  Introduction to Kinesiology
KINE 3338:  Women in Sport and Physical Activity
KINE 4868:  Internship and Capstone

Research:

Ms. Grappendorf’s areas of interest include the study of cause, risk and prevention of childhood obesity, youth physical fitness testing and physical activity/sport participation for girls and women.

Publications:

LaGue, K. & Grappendorf, K. (2009). Promoting physical activity and academic success with adolescent foster youth. Health Education and Behavior, 36(2), 211-213.

Pratt, J. Grappendorf, K., Grundvig, A. & LeBlanc, G. (2009). Gender Differences in Print Media Coverage in the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece.  Women in Sport and Physical Activity Journal, 17(2), 34-41.

Grappendorf, K., Farrell, A., Galante, N. & Wegis, H. (2004).  FITNESSGRAM© Training Video/DVD. [Video Recording/DVD]. Human Kinetics: Champaign, IL.

Presentations:

Grappendorf, K. Building a Model Partnership between Kinesiology and Student Recreation:  Finding Common Ground in an Effort Provide Physical Activity Opportunities for Students. Annual American Kinesiology Association (AKA) Leadership Workshop, Tampa, FL, January 2020.

Grappendorf, K. Strategies for Student Retention: Early Support Systems, First Year Learning Communities and Quality Academic Advising. Annual American Kinesiology Association (AKA) Leadership Workshop, Tampa, FL, January 2020.

Grappendorf, K., Morones, Y., Ziegler-Lopez, K., Monroy, I., Herrera, G., & Thompson, J.  This is How We Row. NACADA: Global Community for Academic Advising Region 9 and 10 Annual Conference, Honolulu, HI, March 2019.

Grappendorf, K., Gage, B., Knutzen, K. Read and Ride: An Innovative Approach to Increasing School Day Physical Activity and Reading Time. 14th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 2016.

LaGue, K., Grappendorf, K., & Brooks, S. Collaborative Approach to Understanding Childhood Obesity in a Low-income, Rural Hispanic Community.  13th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 2015.

Grappendorf, K. Using the Quality Matters Rubric to Design Online Courses. Annual American Kinesiology Association (AKA) Leadership Workshop, San Jose, CA, January 2014.

Other:
Ms. Grappendorf has been in the Department of Kinesiology for 23 years and is in her 9th year as Department Chair.

Full-Time Faculty

Alejandra Barrera-Curiel, Ph.D.
Alejandra Barrera-Curiel, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Phone 661-654-2187
E-mail abarrera2@csub.edu
Office EDUC 141

More Information

Education:
Ph.D. (C) in Health and human Performance, Oklahoma State University (2020)
Dual Degree Program
M.S. Leisure Studies, Oklahoma State University
M.S. Management and Marketing, Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla (2015)
B.S. in Physical Education, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla
Teaching:
KINE 3000 - Motor Development
KINE 4130 – Biomechanics of Exercise and Sport
Research:
  • Age-related neuromuscular changes at the cortical, spinal, and muscular levels.
    • Cortical: cortical excitation and inhibition, and motor cortex representation areas mapping (transcranial magnetic stimulation)
    • Spinal: presynaptic and reciprocal inhibition, sensorimotor integration (electrical stimulation), and motor unit control
    • Muscular: muscle quality and morphology (ultrasonography)
  • Motor control and performance
    • Balance
    • Strength
    • Rate of torque Development
Publications:
  1. vibration-inuced altered stretch reflex sensitivity on maximal unit firing properties. J Neurophysiol., 121: 2215 – 2221.
  2. Magrini, M.A., Thiele, R.M., Colquhoun, R.J., Barrera-Curiel, A., Blackstock, T.S., DeFreitas, J.M. (2018). The reactive limb drop: a simple and novel sensory-motor assessment to predict fall risk in older individuals. J Neurophysiol, 119: 1556 – 1561.

  3. Magrini, M.A., Colquhoun, R.J., Barrera-Curiel, A., Thiele, R.M., DeFreitas, J.M., Smith, D.B., Jenkins, N.D.M. (2018) Muscle size, strength, power, and echo intensity, but not specific tension, are affected by age in physically active adults. Isokinet Exerc Sci. 26 (2): 95-103.

  4. Hester, G.M., Magrini, M.A., Colquhoun, R.J., Barrera-Curiel, A., Estrada, C.A., Olmos, A., Bailly, A., Ha, Phuong, DeFreitas, J.M. (2018). Cross-education: Effects of age on rapid and maximal contractile characteristics. Eur J Appl Physiol, 119 (6): 1313 – 1322.

  5. Hester, G.M., Pope, Z.K., Magrini, M.A., Colquhoun, R.J., Barrera-Curiel, A., Estrada, C.A., Olmos, A.A., DeFreitas, J.M. (2017). Age does not attenuate maximal velocity adaptations in the ipsilateral and contralateral limbs during unilateral resistance training. J Aging Phys Act, 27 (1): 1 – 8.
Other:

Alejandra Barrera-Curiel is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology. She is from Mexico City and grew up surrounded by pyramids, delicious food, and family. She worked in the fitness industry for 5 years and then she started her graduate program in the US. Her academic and professional experience helped her understand that a key element for success in this industry is the ability to relate research, practice, and curriculum inside and outside the classroom. She just finished her PhD at Oklahoma State University and she is very excited for becoming a member of the CSUB family and be a roadrunner. 


Joshua Gordon, M.S., CSCS
Joshua Gordon, M.S., CSCS
Lecturer
Phone 661-654-3152
E-mail jgordon12@csub.edu
Office EDUC 145

More Information

Education:

M.S. Health & Human Movement (Specialization in Exercise Physiology), Utah State University 
B.S. Kinesiology, California State University Fullerton

Teaching:

KINE 2000: Introduction to Kinesiology 
KINE 3030: Applied Kinesiology 
KINE 3040: Exercise Physiology 
KINE 4120: Strength and Conditioning

Publications:

Wagner DR, Teramoto M, Judd T, Gordon J, McPherson C, Robison A. Comparison of A-mode and B-mode Ultrasound for Measurement of Subcutaneous Fat. Ultrasound Med Biol. 2020;46(4):944–951. doi:10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2019.11.018

Gordon JP, Thompson BJ, Crane JS, Bressel E, Wagner DR. Effects of isokinetic eccentric versus traditional lower body resistance training on muscle function: examining a multiple-joint short-term training model. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2019;44(2):118–126. doi:10.1139/apnm-2018-0333

Other:
CSU Bakersfield Track & Field: Volunteer Assistant Coach

Craig Harnetiaux, M.S., ATC, CES
Craig Harnetiaux, M.S., ATC, CES
Lecturer
Phone 661-654-2435
E-mail charnetiaux@csub.edu
Office EDUC 145

Jahyun Kim, Ph.D.
Jahyun Kim, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Phone 661-654-3257
E-mail jkim7@csub.edu
Office EDUC 147

More Information

Education:

Ph.D. in Kinesiology (Specialized in Exercise Physiology), Iowa State University
M.S. in Exercise Science (Specialized in Vascular Physiology), University of Delaware
M.S. in Kinesiology (Specialization: Biologic Basis of Physical Activity), Iowa State University
B.S. IN Physical Education, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea

Teaching:

KINE 3118: Epidemiology
KINE 3040: Exercise Physiology
KINE 6050: Advanced Program Design in Kinesiology
KINE 6700: Current Topics in Kinesiology

Research:

Dr. Kim’s research agenda is cardiovascular systemic and efforts to improve the cardiovascular health of the various clinical population (e.g., cancer survivor, diabetes, older adults, and cardiovascular disease population, etc).  Dr. Kim’s works have focused on microvascular functional and structural improvements with non-pharmaceutical interventions such as exercise, remote ischemic preconditioning, and nutritional intervention and explain molecular mechanisms of these changes.  He is specifically interested in non-traditional exercise interventions to improve the cardiovascular health of clinical populations who are not able to follow the ACSM recommended physical activity guidelines.  Dr. Kim is developing students orientated research programs in CSUB. Students who are interested in cardiovascular systems and want to have hands-on experiences in cardiovascular research with various clinical populations are encouraged to contact him.

Publications:

Jahyun Kim, Warren D. Franke, and James A. Lang. The latency of skin microvascular responses with a single bout of remote ischemic preconditioning. [Under the review in Journal of Applied Physiology]

Richard Gardner, Jeann L. Sabino-Carvalho, Jahyun Kim, Lauro C. Vianna, and James A. Lang. Heart rate variability response to single versus repeated bouts of remote ischemic preconditioning. The Experimental Physiology. 2020 Jul 20 doi:10.1113/EP088789

Jahyun Kim, Warren Franke, and James Lang. Improved endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent skin vasodilator responses following remote ischemic preconditioning. The American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2020 Jan; 1;318(1):H110-H115.

James Lang, Jahyun Kim, Lauro Vianna, and Warren Franke. Effects of seven consecutive days of Ischemic Preconditioning on cutaneous microvascular functions and remodeling. Journal of Physiology.2019 Feb; 597(3): 757-765.

Seungyong Lee, Ashley Bice, Brianna Hood, Juan Ruiz, Jahyun Kim and Rhonda D. Prisby. Influence of the Marrow Microenvironment on Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation of Bone Arteries in Young and Old Fisher-344 rats. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2018 Jun 1; 124(6):1246-1437.

Jahyun Kim, James Lang, Neha Pilania and Warren Franke. Effects of Blood Flow Restricted Exercise Training on Muscular Strength and Blood Flow in Older Adults. Experimental Gerontology. 2017 Oct 99:127-132.

Christopher Martens, James Kuczmarski, Jahyun Kim, M Harris, Shannon Lennon-Edwards, and David Edwards. Voluntary Wheel Running Augments Aortic L-Arginine Transport and Endothelial Function in Rats with Chronic Kidney Diseases. The American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology.  2014 Aug 15;307(4):F418-26.

James Kuczmarski, Christopher Martens, Jahyun Kim, Shannon Lennon-Edwards, and David Edwards. Cardiac Function is Preserved Following 4 Weeks of Voluntary Wheel Running in a Rodent Model of Chronic Kidney Disease. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2014 Sep 1;117(5):482-91.


Jeff Moffit, EdD
Jeff Moffit, EdD
Associate Professor (Exercise Physiology/Biomechanics)
Phone 661-654-6084
Fax 661-654-2067
E-mail jmoffit@csub.edu
Office EDUC 146

More Information

Education:

Ed.D., Physical Education, Emphasis in Physiological Kinesiology, University of Northern Colorado, 2000.
M.A. Physical Education, Emphasis in Exercise Science, California State University, Fresno, 1991.
B.A. Special Major: Exercise Science. California State University, Fresno, 1988.
Transfer. General Education. College of the Sequoias, Visalia, CA, 1985.

Teaching:

KINE 3118: Epidemiology and Wellness
KINE 3030: Applied Kinesiology
KINE 3040: Exercise Physiology
KINE 4110: Exercise Prescription
KINE 4140: Advanced Exercise Physiology
KINE 4150: Clinical Exercise Physiology
KINE 4868: Internship and Capstone

Research:

Dr. Moffit’s research interests include cardiovascular and biomechanical influences on endurance sport performance as well as the application of physical activity for improving health and wellness. He is currently the director of the Human Performance Laboratory where he supervises student interns who gain valuable research and practical experience using modern equipment to measure and evaluate physical attributes and performance capabilities of students, athletes, and the general public.

Dr. Moffit is a Member of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). His engagement in fund raising events has provided support for undergraduate students to attend the South West Chapter meeting of the ACSM since 2004. This annual meeting is where students can present their own research, develop professional networks, and make contacts that lead to career and educational opportunities.

Publications:

Wang, J., Liu, W. & Moffit, J. (2010). What skills and tactics are needed to play pick-up basketball games?  Research in Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport, & Dance, 5(2), 51-57.

Wang, J., Liu, W., & Moffit, J. (2009). Arm and trunk actions of overhead forehand strokes used in badminton games. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 109, 177-186. 

Wang, J., Liu, W., & Moffit, J. (2009). Skills and offensive tactics used by regular players in pick-up basketball games.  Perceptual and Motor Skills, 109, 473-477.

Wang, J. & Moffit, J. (2009). Teaching badminton based on student skill levels. Strategies, 22(6), 14-18.

Boggess, B., Moffit, J., Morales, J., & Anderson, T. (2008).  The effect of kinetic error on the determination of isokinetic work during concentric and eccentric contractions. Journal of Sport Science and Medicine, 7(1), 84-90.

Diboll, D.C. & Moffit, J.M. (2003). A Comparison of Bioelectrical Impedance and Near-Infrared Interactence to Skinfold Measures in Determining Minimum Wrestling Weight in Collegiate Wrestlers. Journal of Exercise Physiology Online, vol. 6, 2.


Tyler Moffit, M.S., CSCS
Tyler Moffit, M.S., CSCS
Lecturer
Phone 661-654-2625
E-mail tmoffit@csub.edu
Office EDUC 144

Brittany Sanchez, Ph.D
Brittany Sanchez, Ph.D
Assistant Professor
Phone 661-654-3137
E-mail bsanchez36@csub.edu
Office EDUC 148

Brian Street, Ph.D
Brian Street, Ph.D
Associate Professor
Phone 661-654-2551
E-mail bstreet1@csub.edu
Website https://sites.google.com/view/drstreetgaitlab/
Office EDUC 139

More Information

Education:

Ph.D., Kinesiology (specialization in Biomechanics and Motor Control), York University, Toronto, ON (supervisor: William H. Gage), 2014

MSc., Sports and Exercise Medicine, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK (supervisor: Roger Eston), 2009  

BSc., Biomedical Science, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia (BSc honours thesis supervisor: James Paul Finn), 2008

Teaching:

Graduate courses                                                                                                                   

EDLD 6090 – Advanced Applied Research & Measurement in Education

Undergraduate courses 

KINE 4800/4850 – Independent Research
KINE 4130 – Biomechanics of Exercise and Sport
KINE 3030 – Applied Kinesiology

Research:

Dr. Street is the Director of the Posture and Gait Neuromechanics Laboratory. The main objective of faculty and student research of this lab is to investigate musculoskeletal, psychomotor and neural factors that influence gait pattern, postural control, balance recovery responses and falls as we age. The populations of focus are those suffering from lower-limb osteoarthritis or recovering from joint replacement and after lower-limb amputation. The second objective is to take first principle findings and integrate them into the development of strategies and intervention treatments/exercises to improve age and disease-specific postural control deficits and reduce the occurrence and impact of falls.

The Posture and Gait Neuromechanics Laboratory features a comprehensive approach to studying gait, dynamic control of balance and fall risk by combining various biomechanical and neurophysiological techniques, including 3D full-body motion analysis, force measurement and surface electromyography coupled with quantitative and qualitative assessment of falls and falls risk. Prospective students interested in research and clinical opportunities should email Dr. Street.


Eugene Wang, PhD
Eugene Wang, PhD
Professor (Physical Education/ Teacher Education)
Phone 661-654-3470
Fax 661-654-2067
E-mail jwang4@csub.edu
Office EDUC 143

More Information

Education:

University of South Carolina ( Ph. D. in Sports Pedagogy)
University of Northern Iowa ( M.A. in  Leisure Services -Youth/Human Services Administration)
Guangzhou Sports University ( M. Ed. in Physical Education /Coaching)
Wuhan Sports University (B. ED. in Physical Education/Coaching)

Teaching:

KINE 3010 Measurement and Evaluation in Kinesiology
KINE 3340 Child and Adolescent Physical Activity and Health
KINE 4240 Technique of Teaching Lifelong Physical Activity and Fitness
KINE 4250 Physical Activity for Diverse Lifespan Populations

Research:

Dr. Wang’s research interests include promoting physical activity among diverse populations, developing motor skill competence among school children, teaching/coaching effectiveness, and physical education teacher education.

Publications:

Wang, J., Liu, W., & Bian, W., (2013). Relationship between perceived and actual motor competence among college students. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 116, 272-279.

Wang, J. & Liu, W. (2012). Changes of learning to play badminton across student skill levels. International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport, & Dance Journal of Research. 7(2), 29-37.

Wang, J., Liu, W, & Moffit, J. (2010). What skills and tactics are needed to play pick-up basketball games?  International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport, & Dance Journal of Research. 5(2), 51-57.

Wang, J., Liu, W, & Moffit, J. (2009). Skills and offensive tactics used in pick-up basketball games. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 109, 473-477.

Wang, J., Liu, W, & Moffit, J. (2009). Steps for arm and trunk actions of overhead forehand strokes used in badminton games across skill levels.  Perceptual and Motor Skills, 109, 177-186.

Wang, J., & Moffit, J. (2009). Teaching badminton based on student skill levels. Strategies, 22 (6), 14-18.

Bian, W., Wang, J., & McKinley, B. (2009). Integrating multicultural education: Activities to celebrate the Chinese New Year.  The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 80 (5), 40-46.

Liu, W., Wang, J. & Xu, F. (2008). Choices of after-school physical activity by middle school children.  International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport, & Dance Journal of Research, 3 (1), 106-115.

Liu, W., Wang, J., & Xu, F. (2008).  Middle school children’s attitudes toward physical activity. International Council for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport, & Dance Journal of Research. 3 (2), 108-117.

Wang, J., & Rairigh, R. M. (2006). Using instructional rubrics in physical education. Journal of Teaching Elementary Physical Education, 17 (3), 37- 41.


Zachary Zenko, Ph.D., PAPHS
Zachary Zenko, Ph.D., PAPHS
Assistant Professor
Phone 661-654-2799
E-mail zzenko@csub.edu
Office EDUC 149

More Information

Education:


Duke University (Postdoctoral Associate)

Iowa State University (PhD in Kinesiology with a focus in exercise psychology)

University of Pittsburgh (MS in Health and Physical Activity, with a focus on research)

Edinboro University of Pennsylvania (BS in Health and Physical Education with a concentration in Human Performance)

Teaching:

KINE 1018: Lifetime Fitness
KINE 3000: Motor Growth and Development Across the Lifespan 
KINE 3020: Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity
KINE 4220: Behavioral Aspects of Physical Activity and Exercise

Research:

Dr. Zenko is interested in promoting physical activity and exercise behavior, and reducing sedentary behavior. Dr. Zenko adopts a dual-process theoretical framework in which physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behavior are influenced jointly by both rational, deliberate and nonrational, automatic processes. Dr. Zenko's work has focused on (a) making the experience of physical activity and exercise more pleasant and enjoyable, (b) understanding decision-making processes that influence physical activity and exercise behavior, and (c) understanding automatic associations with exercise (sometimes called "implicit associations" or "implicit attitudes").

Dr. Zenko welcomes student research assistants and greatly enjoys mentoring students as they take leadership of their own research projects related to exercise and sport psychology. Students are encouraged to reach out to him if they are interested in research opportunities.

Dr. Zenko is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity, and the Society for Transparency, Openness, and Replication in Kinesiology. 

Publications:

1.   Zenko, Z., Kahn, R. M., Berman, C. J., Hutchinson, J., & Jones, L. (in press). Do exercisers maximize their pleasure by default? Using prompts to enhance the affective experience of exercise. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology. doi:10.1037/spy0000183

2.   Box, A. G., Feito, Y., Zenko, Z., & Petruzzello, S. J. (2020). The affective interval: An investigation of the peaks and valleys during high- and moderate-intensity interval exercise. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 49, 101686.

3.   Zenko, Z. (2020). Emphasizing exercise enjoyment to promote activity in the new year. Weight Management Matters, 18(3), 10-11.

4.   Hutchinson, J. C., Zenko, Z., Santich, S., & Dalton, P. C. (2020). Increasing the pleasure and enjoyment of exercise: A novel resistance training protocol. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 42(2), 143-152. https://doi.org/10.1123/jsep.2019-0089

5.   Berman, C. J., O’Brien, J. D., Zenko, Z., & Ariely, D. (2019). The limits of cognitive reappraisal: Changing pain valence, but not persistence, during a resistance exercise task. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16, 3739. doi:10.3390/ijerph16193739

6.   Zenko, Z., & Ekkekakis, P. (2019). Critical review of measurement practices in the study of automatic associations of sedentary behavior, physical activity, and exercise. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 41(5), 271-288. doi:10.1123/jsep.2017-0349
 
7.   Zenko, Z., Willis, E. A., & White, D. A. (2019). Proportion of adults meeting the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans according to accelerometers. Frontiers in Public Health, 7, 135. doi:10.3389/fpubh.2019.00135

8.   Rhodewalt, R., Saur, B., Largent, K., Astorino, T. A., Zenko, Z., & Schubert, M. M. (2019). Effect of fed state on self-selected intensity and affective responses to exercise following public health recommendations. International Journal of Exercise Science, 12(2), 602-613.

9.    Zenko, Z., & Ekkekakis, P. (2019). Internal consistency and validity of  
 measures of automatic exercise associations. Psychology of Sport and  
 Exercise
, 43, 4-15. doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2018.12.005

10. O’Brien, J. D., Kahn, R. M., Zenko, Z., Fernandez, J. R., & Ariely, D. (2018).
 Naïve models of dietary splurges: Beliefs about caloric compensation and  
 weight change following non-habitual overconsumption. Appetite, 128(1),
 321-332.

11. Ekkekakis, P., Zenko, Z., Ladwig, M. A., & Hartman, M. E. (2018). Affect
 as a potential determinant of physical activity and exercise: Critical appraisal  
 of an emerging research field. In D. M. Williams, R. E. Rhodes, & M. Conner
 (Eds.), Affective determinants of health behavior (pp. 237-261). New York:
 Oxford University Press.

 
12. Ekkekakis, P., Zenko, Z., & Werstein, K. M. (2018). Exercise in obesity from
 the perspective of hedonic theory: A call for sweeping change in professional  
 practice norms. In S. Razon & M. L. Sachs (Eds.), Applied exercise
 psychology: The challenging journey from motivation to adherence 
(pp. 289-
 315). New York: Routledge.


13. Zenko, Z., O’Brien, J., Berman, C. J., & Ariely, D. (2017). Comparison of
 affect-regulated, self-regulated, and heart-rate regulated exercise  
 prescriptions: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Psychology of Sport  
 and Exercise, 32
, 124-130. doi:
10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.06.010

14. *Zenko, Z., Ekkekakis, P., & Kavetsos, G. (2016). Changing minds:
 Bounded rationality and heuristic processes in exercise-related judgments
 and choices. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 5(4), 337-351.
 doi:
10.1037/spy0000069

 *Outstanding Paper of the Year Award, Sport, Exercise, and
 Performance Psychology

15. **Zenko, Z., Ekkekakis, P., & Ariely, D. (2016). Can you have your vigorous
 exercise and enjoy it too? Ramping intensity down increases postexercise,  
 remembered, and forecasted pleasure. Journal of Sport & Exercise
 Psychology, 38
(2), 149-159. doi:
10.1123/jsep.2015-0286

 **Excellence in Research Award, Journal of Sport & Exercise
 Psychology

16. Ekkekakis, P., & Zenko, Z. (2016). Escape from cognitivism: Exercise as
 hedonic experience. In M. Raab, P. Wylleman, R. Seiler, A. M. Elbe, & A.
 Hatzigeorgiadis (Eds.), Sport and exercise psychology research: From theory
 to practice 
(pp. 389-414). London: Academic Press.

17. Ekkekakis, P., & Zenko, Z. (2016). Measurement of affective responses to  
 exercise: From “affectless arousal” to “the most well-characterized”  
 relationship between the body and affect. In H. Meiselman (Ed.), Emotion
 measurement 
(pp. 299-321). Duxford, United Kingdom: Woodhead.


18. Ekkekakis, P., Albee, M. J., & Zenko, Z. (2016). Knowledge of exercise
 prescription guidelines across a four-year kinesiology curriculum. Research
 Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 87
(1), 124-130.
 
doi:10.1080/02701367.2015.1083524
  

19. Zenko, Z., & Ekkekakis, P. (2015). Knowledge of exercise prescription  
 guidelines among certified exercise professionals. Journal of Strength and  
 Conditioning Research, 29
(5), 1422-1432.
 
doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000000771


Staff

Tonya Nixon
Administrative Support Coordinator
Phone 661-654-2187
E-mail tnixon1@csub.edu
Office EDUC 142