How to Cite Works of Literature

 

Poems

 

When you are writing about a poem and you use a line of poetry, you want to cite the stanza and line numbers, separated by a period. 

 

In “The Road Not Taken,” Robert Frost implies an autumn setting; this can be seen in the visual images of “a yellow wood” (1.1) and the ground that is littered in “leaves no step had trodden black” (3.12). 

 

Play

 

When you are writing about a play and you use a quote, you want to cite the act, scene, and line numbers.  Since Rhinoceros does not give you the line numbers, when you quote from that play, just give the act and page number, separated by a period.

 

In Eugene Ionesco’s Rhinoceros, Berenger at first pays no mind to the rhinoceroses, merely remarking, “It made plenty of dust” (1.10).

 

Short Story or Novel

 

With a short story or novel, you cite the page number.  A short story should be in quotation marks; a novel or book should be underlined. 

 

In Russell Banks’s “God’s Country,” the theme of decay and isolation springs from the opening line: “The real estate man Harold Dame was dying” (131). 

 

How to Use Quotes Effectively in a Literary Analysis

 

  1. Use an independent clause and a colon. 

 

In Russell Banks’s “God’s Country,” the theme of decay and isolation springs from the opening line: “The real estate man Harold Dame was dying” (131). 

 

  1. Incorporate the quote into the flow of your sentence.

 

In “The Road Not Taken,” Robert Frost implies an autumn setting; this can be seen in the visual images of “a yellow wood” (1.1) and the ground that is littered in “leaves no step had trodden black” (3.12). 

 

  1. Use a simple introductory phrase.

 

In Eugene Ionesco’s Rhinoceros, Berenger at first pays no mind to the rhinoceroses, merely remarking, “It made plenty of dust” (1.10).

 

How to Cite Works of Literature for a Works Cited Page

 

 

You will need to include a works cited page for your anthology, and for your research summary, you will need to include a citation for that article.  Here is how you will cite the different works you find.

 

Poems and short stories are cited the same for a works cited page.  Always begin with the author and the title of the work. 

 

 

  1. If you find a poem from a book of poems by that same author (such as the poems in Transformations) here is how that will look:

Sexton, Anne.  “Cinderella.”  Transformations. 1971. New York: Mariner, 2001. 53-58.

 

  1. If you find the poem in an anthology, here is how that citation will look:

Jacobsen, Rolf.  “Cobalt.”  A Book of Luminous Things.  Ed. Czeslaw Milosz.  New York: Harcourt Brace, 1996.  63.

 

 

  1. If you find the poem from an online source (such as poets.org), here is how that will look:

Simic, Charles.  “Country Fair.”  The Academy of American Poets.  5 Apr 2005.                < http://www.poets.org >

 

 

  1. If you find the poem in a magazine or journal, here is how that will look:

Moritz, A.F.  “You That I Loved.”  Poetry  Jan 2005: 269.

 

The citations on the works cited page must be double-spaced, they must be formatted with hanging indents, and they must be in alphabetical order.  You must also include a citation for each piece of literature, meaning that you will have a minimum of twenty citations on your works cited page for your anthology (since you will have a minimum of twenty works in your anthology).

 

If you have any questions with citations or grammar / mechanics, see me during my office hours or take your paper to the Oasis Tutoring Center located in AE 101.  They will be able to help you with any assignment you have to do for this class.