III Useful Functions in Word (Edited for Word 2000 January 25, 2000)
There are almost unlimited possibilities in Microsoft Word.  Listed below are just a few of the functions that I have used.  I will add new functions to this list if I find they are needed.
(1) Using menus and Dialog Boxes
(2) Getting Help
(3) Defining and Using Styles
(4) Document and Page setup for Research Papers
(5) Auto Text
(6) Equation Editor
(7) Placing & Sizing Graphics
(8) Converting your documant to HTML
(9) Sorting
(10) Using the Drawing Toolbar

(11) Shortcut Keys

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(1) Using menus and Dialog Boxes
 Microsoft Word Menus are rich with useful functions.  You should develop the skill to browse menus and make selections in dialog boxes to maximize your productivity when using Microsoft Word.  Menus and Dialog boxes are quite easy to use.  To use a menu click the menu title and then click your selection on the menu items.  Frequently a dialog box will open with additional choices that can be made.  As an example look at (4) Document and Page setup for Research Papers
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(2) Getting Help
Office Assistant

Help Menu

Books CBT
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(3) Defining and Using Styles: The format menu 
Dragging the down arrow by the Style button on the Format Toolbar will let you apply a pre defined style to selected text. A style is a set of format commands including font type, size, text alignment, margins, indent, etc., see above example. Word comes with some pre-defined styles such as heading formats.
To define a style--Warning:  Define Styles… is really for the expert at Word, so if you don't feel you fit into this category, you may wish to skip this part and come back later. Styles are something that have many definitions in this program. It is very important to keep the differences in mind. A "style" can apply to the formatting of the text (Font, Bold, etc.) or to the style as it applies to a paragraph (spacing, justification, etc.). When styles are collectively applied to paragraphs, they are referred to as "style sheets." A style sheet for a paragraph contains all of the information for the formatting of the paragraph. It is very important to remember that a style sheet contains specific information for the ENTIRE paragraph: only 1 font, 1 size, though you can have an unlimited number of character formats (bold, italic, etc.) as long as the formatting applies to the entire paragraph.

You can create a style sheet by example. First, type in some sample text in its own paragraph (remember "paragraph" for a word processing program means a line ended with an <Enter> key). Format the paragraph exactly as you would like it to look. Choose all of the indents, tabs, etc. you would like for the paragraph. Select your paragraph. Now, choose "Styles…" from the Format menu. Type in a code name and click on OK. Your style sheet will be noted in the style box on Format Toolbar.

To select a new (already defined) style, click on the down arrow at the side of the style box on the ruler and drag to choose your preferred style. You can also have style sheets access other style sheets:  a real time saver.  An example will help to explain this.  Let's suppose we are typing up a multiple choice exam that allows three choices for answers. We want it to look something like the following:
1. This is the first question and it wraps to the              following line so it looks something like this
        a.     This is answer a
        b.     This is answer b
        c.     This is answer c

2. This is the second question and it wraps to the following line so it looks something like this
        a.     This is answer a
        b.     This is answer b
        c.     This is answer c
I've set up my style sheets so that question #1 is set up with a sheet called question.  Answer a is set up with a sheet called a, answer b is set up with a sheet called b, and answer c is set up with a sheet called c.  Style sheet question is set up with the letter a in the box that says Next Style:.  Style sheet a has b in its Next Style:.  Style sheet b has c as its Next Style:.  Style sheet c has question as its Next Style:.  What all this means is this:  all I have to do is type in my question, hit the «RETURN», type in answer a, hit the «RETURN», type in answer b, hit the «RETURN», type in answer c, hit the «RETURN», and type in the next question.  The style sheets are chained together like a train—each style sheet searches another.

One quick shortcut for changing styles:  hold down the <Shift> key and the <Ctrl>  key and type an s.  The style box will be selected and you can use the arrows to move up or down the available styles or you can  type in the name of the style sheet and hit the «RETURN» key.  The paragraph is automatically formatted according to the style sheet indicated.

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(4) Document and Page Setup, Page Numbers and Footnotes
For Research Papers
(a) Page Setup File menu (Margins, Page Size, Paper Source, Layout)
(b) Page Numbers
(c) Footnotes
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(a). Page Setup -File menu
The Page Setup command is one of the most important commands in the File menu.  From here you control the settings of your entire document e.g. Margins, Paper Size, Paper Source and Layout.  By clicking on each tab of the dialog box that opens you get the choice boxes where you can tell the computer exactly the size of your margins, choose the print orientation (normal or sideways), control margin size, choose type of paper, etc.

Choose Page Setup from the File menu then the dialog box that appears:

Margins
Default Margins are (I have changed the margins in the example): 
  • Top 1 inch
  • Bottom 1 inch
  • Left 1.25 inch
  • Right 1.25 inch
  • Header .5 inch
  • Footer .5 inch
Click Mirror margins to have the margins of pages in a book format have "mirrored margins" when looking at an open page 

Click 2 pages per sheet to have each 1/2 page numbered and formatted as a page 

Gutter position defines where the margin is wider to incorporate the space for staples or other types of binding. 

You can change the choices and apply the change to this section, from this point forward or for the whole document. 

Figure XX
Paper Size
Paper size is selectable but dependent on your printer. Click the down arrow beside the paper size box to choose a size 

Orientation, whether the page prints the length of the paper, the normal orientation, Portrait, or the page prints the width of the paper, Landscape can be chosen by clicking the appropriate choice. 

These choices can be determined for this section or for the whole document.


Figure XX
Paper Source
Paper source is dependent on the capability of your printer.  Check out the choices for your printer.

Layout
On this tab you can determine: 
  • Section Start; if the print starts on an odd or even page
  • headers and Footers; 
    • Different odd and even headers and footers
    • Different first page (no headers or footers for a title page or header with logo for a business letter)
Figure XX

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(b) Page numbering-- sections
 
One way to have an unnumbered  title page followed by the paper or report with numbered pages, like a report or college research/term paper  was treated in Multiple Formats in Word Editing.
It is possible to number pages in a variety of ways in Word. The default page numbering for Microsoft Word is consecutive numbers throughout your paper starting at the first page and number 1.  This can be easily changed in several ways.  One possibility is having roman numerals instead of numbers.  Another possibility is establishing sections in your document and then being able to number the separate sections in different ways.  Each chapter could start with 1,  the first few pages of a text could be numbered with roman numerals,  the first page, a title page, could have no page number and the second page, the first page of text, could start with a 1 are another possibility.  For this more flexible numbering method:

Establish sections at the appropriate places ( title page, table of contents, chapters, appendixes, etc.) by placing your cursor at the end of the section:


Figure XX

Figure  XX
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(c). Footnotes-Insert-->Footnote
Formatting Footnote/Endnotes: To make choices about the format of End notes or  Footnotes (floating footer), appear at the bottom of the correct page):


Figure  XX

Figure  XX
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(5) Auto Text
Insert AutoText (if the autotext tool is not visible choose View, ToolBars, AutoText
This option will let you create boiler plate paragraphs and easily insert them as needed  in your text.  This option is available only if Auto text has been defined.
Defining AutoText
First type in a frequently used phrase or paragraph such as "California State University Bakers field"
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(6) Equation Editor
This option will let you create a formula with correct mathematical notation in your document. It is treated as an object.
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(7) Placing & Sizing Graphics
You can create graphics in a variety of programs Adobe PhotoShop, MicrosoftPaint, Adobe Illustrator and you can also find sample art, pictures and clip art in the Insert, Picture, Clip art. Clip art can also be purchased and free clip art can be found on the web.
Placing a Graphic from another application
Resizing a graphic
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(8) Converting your Documenet to a web page
It is very easy to convert a document to a web page (html).
(1) Create a finished document (check spelling, syntax....).
(2) create a file folder your hard drive or floppy with an appropriate name for your web page.
(3) Choose Save as Web Page...  from the  File menu and save in your folder created in step "2"

Of course you will still need to place you new web documant on a web server.  For steps to do this at CSUB, check:

http://www.csubak.edu/~jross/classes/GS390/Internet/WEBSteps.htm

One big problem with web documants created with this method is they contain a large amount of excess code.  A thoughtful web master would download and use the following to make your web document cleaner and quicker to read by a browser.

http://officeupdate.microsoft.com/2000/downloadDetails/Msohtmf2.htm
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(9) Sorting
Sort is a very handy function.  It  sorts the paragraphs , ( also rows in a table or items in a database) you've selected, places them in alphabetical, reverse alphabetical or numerical order if they are numbered.  This is tremendously handy for sorting bibliographies after you have typed them into a document or to alphabetically order a mailing list. You could even rearrange the paragraphs in a document by numbering them in the order you want them and sorting.  In the first list below I have listed the sources as I find them for a paper on humor (the listing is incomplete since this is an ongoing project). When I am ready to print a final copy of my bibliography I select all listings then choose Sort from the Table menu and I get my second list.
    My original list
Hovec, Mac Frank Humor: Theory History Application. (PN 6147 .M12 1988)

Holland, Norman Laughing, A Psychology of Humor. Ithica and London: Cornell University Press, 1982

Koller, Marvin R. Humor and Society,  Houston: Cap and Gown Press, Inc. 1988 [HM 24 K615 1988]. Very comprehensive book on sociology of humor significance, psychological, history, media, race, age, sex and gender, urban-rural, cross-cultural, ethnic, social structure, education,, politics, military, occupation, family, medical, sports, etc.

Faulkner, Joseph Sociology Through humor, St. Paul, West Publishing Co. 1987. Anthology introduce contribution humor makes to understanding human behavior. Themes around classic intro. Soc. topics

    My sorted list
Faulkner, Joseph Sociology Through humor, St. Paul, West Publishing Co. 1987. Anthology introduces the contribution humor makes to understanding human behavior. Themes around classic intro. Soc. topics

Holland, Norman Laughing A Psychology of Humor. Ithica and London: Cornell University Press, 1982

Hovec, Mac Frank Humor: Theory History Application. (PN 6147 .M12 1988)

Koller, Marvin R. Humor and Society,  Houston: Cap and Gown Press, Inc. 1988 [HM 24 K615 1988]. Very comprehensive book on sociology of humor significance, psychological, history, media, race, age, sex and gender, urban-rural, cross-cultural, ethnic, social structure, education,, politics, military, occupation, family, medical, sports, etc.

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(10) Using the Drawing Toolbar-- A brief overview
  • Choose View/Toolbars and check by "Drawing" if the toolbar is not on the bottom of the screen or click the  icon if it is visable on your toolbar at the  top of your page.

  • Draw Tools
  • Draw Options (click Draw on Drawing Toolbar
  • AutoShapes; provide manty choices to styles for a textbox
  • Word Art; provides a wide selection for text
  • Word Art Dialog Box is used to type in your text

    Word Art ToolBar is uses to edit your WordArt


     
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    (10) Shortcut Keys
    Experienced typist use short cut keys to save time.  Some of the most common are listed below.  These are specific for the PC but just use the  <> key instead of the <Ctrl> key for the Macintosh.

    Use the Help wizard to find other short cut keys

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    Proposed Additions:
    Outlining
    Find and Replace
    View Menu
    Page and section breaks
    More on Grammar, thesaurus, dictionary options
    Calculator tool
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