Current Courses:

  • Philosophy 102 Course Philosophy 102: Logical Reasoning
    • This course focuses on developing critical thinking skills related to the analysis and evaluation of arguments. Using real-life cases from jury trials, political debates, advertising campaigns, social controversies, and scientific studies, we will identify the structure of arguments, evaluate them with regard to their validity, soundness, and reliability, identify common informal fallacies, and practice constructing good arguments.

     

  • Philosophy 309 Course Philosophy 309: Recent Continental Philosophy
    • This course provides a study of recent work within the Continental European tradition. We will survey several influential movements from the latter half of the 20th century: critical theory, hermeneutics, structuralism, French feminism, deconstruction, poststructuralism, postcolonialism, and postmodernism.

     

  • Philosophy 333 Course Philosophy 333: Political Philosophy and Thought
    • This course examines various theories of the nature of social and political life. This quarter we will survey significant contributions to Western political philosophy from ancient, modern, and contemporary sources. We will ask, for example: What is the nature and purpose of government? What is the best political system? When and why are we obligated to obey the government? We will also explore the concepts of justice, rights, equality, liberty, and the relationships between the individual, community, and state.

     

  • Philosophy 381 Course Philosophy 381: Feminist Philosophy
    • This course provides an introduction to feminist philosophy through a directed examination of the beliefs, assumptions and values found in traditional and contemporary philosophical analyses of women. Topics include feminist revisions of the philosophical canon, critiques of patriarchy, feminist approaches to reason and rationality, the ethics of care, the intersecting critiques of sexism, racism and homophobia, and feminist approaches to social change.

     

  • Philosophy 411 Course Philosophy 411: Marx, Marxism and Post-Marxism
    • An examination of the central ideas of Marxist philosophy, economics and social theory, both through the writings of Marx and others who contributed to the development of this tradition such as Engles, Lenin, Mao, Horkheimer, Althusser and others. Study will include the question of the relevance of Marxism in a post-communist world, through the writings of contemporary social theorists.

     

  • Philosophy 435 Course Philosophy 435: Philosophy of Law
    • This course addresses issues common to both philosophy and law through the study of legal theories from Natural Law, Positivism and Legal Realism, to Law and Economics and Critical Legal Studies. Attention will be paid to the nature, origin and scope of rights, the specifics of legal reasoning and constitutional law, and the roles played by the legal system in the contemporary world. Additional issues may include capital punishment, sex and gender discrimination, changes in tort law, and the growth of the prison industry or other selected topics.