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Codebook for Data Set reprsp.por

John L. Korey, Political Science, Calif State Polytechnic University Pomona
JeDon Emenhiser, Government and Politics,Humboldt State University

© The Authors, 1998; Last modified 14 August 1998

 
CHAMBER Chamber
1 -- Senate
2 -- Assembly
DISTRICT District Number

DISTRICT DATA

URBAN Percent living inside urbanized areas
EURAMER Percent European American
AFRAMER Percent African American
ASNAMER Percent Asian American/Pacific Islander
NATAMER Percent Native American
LATINO Percent Latino
LT18 Percent under 18 years old
GE65 Percent 65 years old and older
MARRIED Percent of households with married couple
MARCHLD Percent of households with married couple and children under 18
HIGHSCH Percent of persons 25 or older who are at least high school graduates
COLLEGE Percent of persons 25 or older who are at least college graduates
PRCAPINC Per capita income
POVERTY Percent of persons living below poverty
OWNOCC Percent of occupied houses that are owner-occupied
REGISTER Democratic party registration as percent of two-party registration, October 1996
LEGVOTE Democratic percent of two-party vote in legislative races. For assembly districts and odd-numbered senate districts: November, 1996; for even-numbered senate districts, November 1994. Note this variable should be used with caution in analyzing the Senate, since the political environment in 1996 was quite different from what it had been two years earlier. Also, in the 8th SD, neither the Democratic nor Republican candidate was successful - the race was won by an independent, Quentin Kopp. His votes are not included in the data.
PROP209 Percent Voting Yes on Proposition 209, the California Civil Rights Initiative, eliminating a number of affirmative action programs, November 1996 (Passed)
PROP210 Percent Voting Yes on Proposition 210, increasing the minimum wage, November 1996 (Passed)
PROP215 Percent Voting Yes on Proposition 215, permitting the medical use of marijuana, November 1996 (Passed)
PROP217 Percent Voting Yes on Proposition 217, reinstating higher tax rates on upper income taxpayers, November 1996 (Failed)
PROP218 Percent Voting Yes on Proposition 218, making it harder for local governments to raise taxes, November 1996 (Passed)
DISTLIB Composite district liberalism (100 = most liberal; 0 = most conservative)
To create this variable, the first component was extracted from a principal components factor analysis (carried out separately for the Assembly and the Senate) of the results for the five statewide propositions included in the study. To convert this score to a scale that would range from 0 to 100, the following formula was used:

 DISTLIB =100* (FACTOR - C1)/C2, where:

    FACTOR = the district's principal component score,
    C1 = the minimum FACTOR score among all districts in the Assembly or Senate, and
    C2 = -C1 + the maximum FACTOR score.

MEMBER DATA

NAME Member's Surname
PARTY Member's Party
1 -- Democrat
2 -- Republican
3 -- Independent
TERMLIM Year Member Reaches Term Limit
YEARBORN Year Member Born
GENDER Member's Gender
1 -- Male
2 -- Female
ETHNIC Member's Ethnicity
1 -- European American
2 -- African American
3 -- Latino
4 -- Asian American
5 -- Native American
CHAIR Standing Committee Chair
0 -- No
1 -- Yes
VCHAIR Standing Committee Vice-Chair
0 -- No
1 -- Yes
ROLLCALL Composite Roll Call Voting Score, 1997 (100 = most conservative; 0 = most liberal). To create this variable, the first component was extracted from a principal components factor analysis (carried out separately for the Assembly and the Senate) of the ratings of several interest groups. To convert this score to a scale that would range from 0 to 100, the following formula was used:

 ROLLCALL =100* (FACTOR - C1)/C2, where:

    FACTOR = the member's principal component score,
    C1 = the minimum FACTOR score in the chamber, and
    C2 = -C1 + the maximum FACTOR score.
Senators Craven and Dills and Assemblyman Caldera are not included because they missed a number of votes and were not rated by several of the groups. 

The following groups ratings were used: the California Chamber of Commerce, Gun Owners of California, the California Taxpayers' Association, the California League of Conservation Voters, the California Public Interest Research Group (CALPIRG). Scores were as listed by each organization except as follows:

    CALPIRG did not rate Senator Ayala because he missed too many roll calls. Since all other groups rated him, we calculated his CALPIRG score based on the record he did have. The California Chamber of Commerce scores individual votes, but does not provide an overall rating. We computed ratings as the percent of votes or abstentions or absences favoring the Chamber's position. Excused absences were not included in the calculations.

Sources:

Social, economic, and demographic characteristics of district: 1990 census.

Registration data: Secretary of State, Report of Registration (October 1996).

District voting data: Secretary of State, Statement of Vote (November 1996). For votes on propositions, data appear to be incorrect for some senate districts, and to not total correctly to statewide results. For this reason, data from assembly districts were aggregated to the senate district level.

Year of birth and term limit status, and committee chairs and vice chairs: A.G. Block and Claudia Buck, California Politics Almanac 1997-1998 (Sacramento: State Net, 1997). Note: The Almanac contained several omissions in its listing of chairs and vice-chairs. The missing information was obtained from the web pages of the assembly (http://www.assembly.ca.gov/) and the senate (http://www.senate.ca.gov/) on March 1, 1998. According to these sources, Ayala is vice-chair of the Senate Agriculture and Water Resources Committee, Greene is vice-chair of the Senate Legislative Ethics Committee, Johannessen is chair of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, and Miller is vice-chair of the Assembly Budget Committee.

Roll call voting scores were obtained from the interest groups making the ratings.
 


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