JavaScript is required for basic dynamic and interactive browsing.

CSUB Law Concentrations and Emphases

PreLaw in CSUB Majors

Three degree programs offer a pre-law concentration.  Those three disciplines are Economics, Philosophy, and Political Science.  Typically the Pre-Law concentration requires three or four law-related courses that provide insight into the discipline's special role in law and legal process.

Not only is there a pre-law concentration in each of those majors, but all three have a pre-law minor composed of courses from the other two disciplines -- e.g. a pre-law minor for Economics requires two courses each from Philosophy and Political Science. 

With the approval of the Associate Vice Provost for Academic Programs, it is possible to enroll in a special Pre-Law major or Pre-Law minor apart from the approved programs already in place.  Students interested in such a possibility should consult the University Pre-Law Advisor or a faculty member in the student's area of greatest interest.

It is likely that the semester calendar curriculum will change the majors, concentrations, and minors in limited ways.  For example, the Political Science "pre-law" concentration will henceforward likely be a "Law & Society" concentration.  It is highly probable, however, that all three of these disciplines will continue to provide a pre-law option in one form or another.  Prospective students are encouraged to watch for the curriculum changes that will come in Fall 2016 when the University moves to the semester calendar.

Students should note that the pre-law majors, concentrations, and minors are not "law school".  You learn skills and subject matter in these CSUB programs that make for success in law school and legal careers.  It is especially important to note that such CSUB curriculum is not designed for successful test taking, such as the LSAT, which is used by law schools to predict your success when you leave your undergraduate studies behind and go on to law school.  Every serious applicant should find out everything he or she can about the Law School Admissions Test well in advance of taking it, optimally in June or September before applying to law school.