Voice Lessons

Music majors who are singers are required to take private applied lesson in voice each quarter of residency as a music major. This applied study is considered the primary, foundational study for all music majors. Although it is only one unit of academic credit, applied music study should remain a primary focus of each music major and each quarter of study culminates is a performance jury performed before the music faculty.

Goals to be reached upon completion of lower division applied study (MUS 123 & 223)

The singer should have technical command of the voice as demonstrated by the coordinated and balanced us of breath, resonance, and articulation systems of the singing voice and by showing evidence of technical proficiency in the pronunciation of singing English, Italian, and German languages commonly found in the art song repertoire from the sixteenth century to the present. Students by the end of their sophomore year should be capable of independently learning and memorizing fifteen minutes of music per academic term. The singer will demonstrate proper performance techniques in quarterly studio recitals, large and small ensemble concerts, and graded jury examinations. Singers demonstrate performance technique by application of appropriate posture, alignment, breath control and support, free phonation including balanced onset and release, advancing use of resonators and correct diction in at least English, Italian, and German. Students should have the ability to perform a half recital by this stage of their study. 

Singers are to present an upper level review jury before being allowed to advance to upper division studio work. The jury will be supported by repertoire list showing the music mastered by the student to date and a double length jury at which the student will be asked to sing works representative of the historical style periods and various languages. 

Goals to be reached upon completion of upper division applied study (MUS 323 & 423)

The singer should have excellent technical command of the voice as demonstrated by the sophisticated and cultivated use of the breath, resonance, and articulation systems of the singing voice, and by showing evidence of technical proficiency in the pronunciation of singing French in addition to English, Italian, and German languages already discussed. Students, by the end of their senior year should be capable of independently learning and memorizing thirty minutes of music per academic term. The singer will demonstrate advanced performance techniques in quarterly studio recitals, large and small ensemble concerts, and graded jury examinations. Singers demonstrate performance techniques and artistry by the technically correct and artistically expressive performance of various examples from the standard concert repertoire. Students should have the ability to perform a full recital by this stage of their study. 

Singers choosing to perform a recital for their culminating senior project work closely with their academic advisor, their studio teacher, and a music faculty committee to develop an acceptable recital proposal and a permission exam at which the recital is performed for the committee members only. Supporting documentation such as the proposal, concert program, notes, texts, and translation should all be prepared, and approved, well in advance of the permission date. 






Lesson Objective

The musician should have developed a keen understanding of musical phraseology and function and its effect on rhythmic nuance and accent. Knowledge gained from the study of music should allow the student to identify and evaluate the needs of the musical moment in performance and communicate his or her understanding to others with clarity.

Meet your Applied Music Faculty

Applied Faculty