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Course Descriptions

Click HERE to view the 2014-2015 MBA Course Schedule

Accounting

ACCT 600 Financial Accounting for Leaders (4 units) [Core]

This course focuses on the use of financial statements in evaluating the success or failure of a business. Financial statements are the main method of communicating business results. Leaders in business and without need such knowledge.

ACCT 620 Accounting for Decision Making and Control (4) [Core]

This course examines how accounting information is used in managerial decision-making and control. The course stresses how to use rather than how to prepare accounting reports. Topics to be covered include: basic cost concepts, cost volume profit relationships, product costing, differential analysis, strategic product pricing, cost allocation, budgeting and the evaluation of financial performance. This course is designed for MBA and MPA students who have not had ACCT 303 Cost Accounting or its equivalent. Prerequisite: completion of all required MBA 500-level courses or permission of the instructor. This course is not open to students who have taken ACCT 303 Managerial Accounting or its equivalent.

ACCT 640 Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis (4)

This course examines how generally accepted accounting principles impact the quality and volatility of both earning and cash flow. Specific focus will be placed upon the recent accounting scandals which led to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the ethical issues these scandals have raised. Other current topics will be discussed. ACCT 677 Selected Topics in Accounting (5) Special topic courses provide each department with the opportunity to present an in-depth study of a selected subject not covered in regular courses. When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course. Each department will determine applicability toward the concentration.

ACCT 450/650 Accounting Ethics (4)

This course will focus on the unique issues and obligations of professional accountants. We will begin this study with a discussion of why accounting ethics matters and why students should study ethics at this point in their academic career. Further, students will examine what it means to be a professional accountant and will discuss what virtues accountants must possess to best serve the public interest. Students will study the language of ethics and will be able to distinguish between principles and rules. High profile cases will be used to demonstrate the failings of the profession and individual accountants. An in-depth study of ethical standards for the various professional accounting organizations at the national and state levels will enable students to understand the ethical framework from which they will operate as professional accountants. Prerequisites: ACCT 301 or graduate standing.

ACCT 677 Selected Topics in Accounting (4)

Special topic courses provide each department with the opportunity to present an in-depth study of a selected subject not covered in regular courses.When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course. Each department will determine applicability toward the concentration.

ACCT 699 Individual Graduate Study in Accounting (4)

Individual study is offered to give the student experience in planning and outlining a course of study on the student’s own initiative under departmental supervision. Independent study should deal with a special interest not covered in a regular course or with the exploration in greater depth of a subject presented in a regular course. Instructor consent is required. No more than 5 quarter units may be used to satisfy degree requirements. (May not be substituted for any required graduate seminar).

Economics 

ECON 510 Economic Issues in Health and Health Care (4)

Study of health issues using the economic perspective. Topics include lifestyle choices and health outcomes, technology and demand, health insurance, labor markets in the health professions, role of government in health care markets, role of nonprofits, international comparisons of health care systems, and reform proposals.

ECON 661 Managerial Economics (4)

A study of the tools of economic analysis oriented toward analysis of managerial behavior and the managerial decision making process as related to demand analysis, cost and pricing problems,market organization, forecasting, capital budgeting, and location analysis. Carries credit in either Business Administration or Economics.

ECON 677 Selected Topics (4)

Special topic courses provide each department with the opportunity to present an in-depth study of a selected subject not covered in regular courses.When offered prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.

ECON 680 Labor Economics (4)

This course covers topics in labor economics including dynamic theories of labor supply, employment, and unemployment; labor supply in a household framework; and labor market activity and income distribution. It explores both theoretical models and empirical tests in each area. Prerequisites: ECON

ECON 699 Individual Graduate Study (4)

This is an investigation of an approved project leading to a written report. The project is selected in conference with a professor in an area of major interest; regular meetings are to be arranged with professor.

 

Finance

FIN 600 Seminar in Financial Management and Policy (4) [Core]

This course addresses the formulation of financial policies for obtaining and using financial resources for the purpose of value creation. Heavy emphasis is placed on the analysis of real-world cases that focus on the decisions confronting the financial manager. Statistical analysis, financial analysis, and advanced spreadsheet applications are required. Students will be challenged with both theoretical and practical problems in the following areas: performance analysis, long-term planning, working capital management, capital budgeting, long-term financing, acquisitions, and international financial management. Student presentations are required.

FIN 620 Seminar in Investments (4)

This course includes discussion and analysis of security investments. Emphasis directed toward understanding financial investment theories and concepts from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. Topics include: securities markets, risk and return, portfolio theory, asset pricing theory, valuation, fundamental analysis, and portfolio management. Case analysis, statistical analysis, and other computer applications are required.

FIN 640 Short Term Financial Management (4)

This is an in-depth exploration of subjects essential to an enterprise’s financial success. Topics covered include management of the firm’s working capital accounts (i.e. receivables, inventories, and payables), short term financing alternatives, cash management systems, short term investments choices, financial institution relationships, and electronic payment and information management systems.

FIN 677 Selected Topics in Finance (4)

Special topic courses provide each department with the opportunity to present an in-depth study of a selected subject not covered in regular courses.When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.

FIN 680 Seminar in Real Estate Investments (4)

This course investigates methods of analyzing real estate investments. It includes an examination of appraisal methods, capitalization approaches, and cash flow models. Consideration is also given to legal, tax, and financing issues. Specific project analysis techniques are part of the course, i.e., analysis of residential properties, commercial properties and shopping centers. A term project and oral presentation are required along with computer applications.

FIN 685 Seminar in International Financial Management (4)

This course looks at the international financial environment, including balance of payments, the international monetary system, foreign exchange and financial markets. Specific topics include managing foreign exchange exposure, domestic versus foreign financing, cash management, political risk, and international legal constraints. A term project and oral presentation will be a part of the course.

FIN 699 Individual Graduate Study in Finance (4)

Individual study is offered to give the student experience in planning and outlining a course of study on the student’s own initiative under departmental supervision. Independent study should deal with a special interest not covered in a regular course or with the exploration in greater depth of a subject presented in a regular course. Instructor consent is required. No more than 5 quarter units may be used to satisfy degree requirements. (May not be substituted for any required graduate seminar).

 

Management

MGMT 600 Seminar in Organizational Theory and Design (4)

This is a study of the theories and research that explain why business organizations operate the way they do. A social systems perspective is presented that views the business organization’s external environment and structure as critical determinants of organizational effectiveness. Key department-level and organizational level variables and models are studied with the goal of developing an understanding of the patterns and relationships among organizational dimensions such as strategy, goals, size, technology, and external environment. The case method is used extensively to develop skill in diagnosing and solving organizational design problems.

MGMT 602 Seminar in Operations and Technology Management (4) [Core]

This course is an examination of principles related to effective utilization of factors of production in manufacturing and non-manufacturing systems. This course uses extensive readings and case studies to define and analyze problems of productivity improvement, production planning, inventory management, quality control, system design and implementation from the operating manager’s perspective. Issues in management of technology-based organizations, capacity planning, scheduling, facilities design, operations strategy in services, and supply chain management will also be explored.

MGMT 604 Advanced Organizational Behavior (4)

This course provides a review and extension of the basic theoretical and conceptual framework necessary for making sense out of behavior in organizations. The emphasis is on applying theory and concept to management, particularly in business organizations. Topics include: individual differences, perception, learning, motivation, group dynamics, communication, leadership, conflict management, organizational structure, organizational culture, and change management. Application is made through case studies, analysis of video clips, and through group and classroom discussions.

MGMT 605 Managerial Skills (4) [Core]

This course focuses on developing and enhancing managerial skills that are of major importance for current and future career survival and success. Specific skill areas include: self-management, communication, decision making, motivation, delegation, team management, diversity management, negotiation, organizational politics, and change management. The course is primarily experiential in nature with skill assessments, exercises, role-plays, case studies, and group discussion activities being the primary learning tools. Relevant literature from the behavioral sciences will provide a knowledge base for skill development.

MGMT 610 Seminar in Human Resource Management (4)

This course is about the strategic management of human capital. A strategic analysis of the traditional human resource management functions-selection, compensation, recruiting, and training-will be completed. The influences of the legal environment are also considered. Other topics focus on the tools that are used to manage data necessary to manage human capital effectively. These include HR based change management methods, process mapping HR processes, and Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS).

MGMT 650 Seminar in Global Operations Management (4)

This course introduces students to a conceptual framework which will help them recognize and meet international operations management challenges. It studies issues relating to global sourcing and logistics, and manufacturing competencies of different nations. Topic areas include: strategic planning for global competitiveness,managing global facilities, managing global supply chains, improving operations performance, world class manufacturing, building a strategic alliance, coordinating international manufacturing and technology, and overcoming the limits to global operations project.

MGMT 655 Seminar in Statistical Analysis (4)

The issues and methods involved in conducting business research will be explored. Students will collect data that will then be analyzed by utilizing a variety of statistical techniques via computer. Bi-variate, multivariate and non-parametric techniques will be covered. A strong emphasis will be placed on the use of statistics to aid in managerial decision-making. Examples of actual business research will be reviewed.

MGMT 670 Advanced Reading in Management (4)

This course will develop skills in graduate students to support continued professional and academic development beyond their current degree program. While traditional college learning is focused on textbooks, the knowledge that is presented in these books typically first appeared in academic journals books produced by researchers for the professional public. The purpose of this course is to introduce graduate students to this type of literature and to enhance their ability to critically read, evaluate, and learn from this literature. The format of the course is that of a seminar, requiring extensive reading and preparation before class in order to facilitate in depth analysis and discussion during class.

MGMT 677 Selected Topics in Management (4)

Special topic courses provide each department with the opportunity to present an in-depth study of a selected subject not covered in regular courses.When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.

MGMT 680 e-Business: Challenges and Opportunities (4)

This course provides students with a conceptual framework for understanding the challenges and opportunities that face e-Business systems. The course is cross-functional, decision focused, and strategic in its orientation. Different types of e-Business applications are analyzed based on web site reviews and case studies. The course includes a practicum in which teams of students build a prototype e-Business system. Specific topics covered include the integration of supply chain management and e- Business, e-procurement, selling, chain management, enterprise resource planning, collaborative computing technologies, virtual team management, considerations for hardware and software development and/or purchasing, controlling e-Business cost, quality, and risks, and the legal and social environment of e-Business.

MGMT 690 Seminar in Strategic Management (4) [Core]

The subject of this course is competitive behavior and the “strategy” of business firms. Competition is defined to be the effort to create and retain economic value within an environment of interdependence among competing firms. Strategic behavior is the effort of a firm as a coherent objective-seeking entity to create economic value within a competitive environment. An understanding of strategic behavior requires a close examination of 1) business objectives, 2) firm structural interdependence, and 3) value creation within the structure of competitive interdependence. Prerequisites: FIN 600, MGMT 600, and MKTG 600

MGMT 699 Individual Graduate Study in Management (4)

Individual study is offered to give the student experience in planning and outlining a course of study on the student’s own initiative under departmental supervision. Independent study should deal with a special interest not covered in a regular course or with the exploration in greater depth of a subject presented in a regular course. Instructor consent is required. No more than 5 quarter units may be used to satisfy degree requirements. (May not be substituted for any required graduate seminar).

 

Management Information Systems

MIS 610 Information Systems for Leaders (4) [Core]

Information and information systems (IS) are vital organizational resources and constitute an integral part of managerial decision making. It is important to understand how managers can effectively utilize IS to achieve organizational goals. The objective of this course is to train students to identify, understand, and resolve managerial issues surrounding the use and management of IS in organizations. The course adopts the perspective that, in a world where the half-life of a particular hardware or software technology is often measured in months, developing intuitions about the core concepts to assess and deploy Information Systems is more valuable to future managers than learning the intricate details of a specific technology. The focus of the course is to develop - through cases, lectures, discussions, examples, application development assignments, and a system analysis and design project - insights into when and how MIS can be used to create and enhance an organization’s competitive advantage.

MIS 630 Applied Decision Support and Expert Systems (4)

This course will provide an overview of decision support (DSS) and expert systems (ES) with specific focus on their conceptual models; the inter-relationship between DSS and ES, and their architectures. Specifically, this course will focus on the use of decision support technologies for future executives. A variety of scenarios related to the future of decision support and expert systems technologies will be examined. New technologies from the growing field of applied artificial intelligence (AI) will also be explored. Finally, students will design and implement small-scale decision support and executive information systems using commercial software.

MIS 677 Selected Topics in MIS (4)

Special topic courses provide each department with the opportunity to present an in-depth study of a selected subject not covered in regular courses.When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.

MIS 699 Individual Graduate Study in MIS (4)

Individual study is offered to give the student experience in planning and outlining a course of study on the student’s own initiative under departmental supervision. Independent study should deal with a special interest not covered in a regular course or with the exploration in greater depth of a subject presented in a regular course. Instructor consent is required. No more than 5 quarter units may be used to satisfy degree requirements. (May not be substituted for any required graduate seminar).

 

Marketing

MKTG 600 Seminar in Marketing Management (4) [Core]

This course presents development of marketing strategy for the organization and design of integrated product service, promotion, and distribution programs utilizing systems analysis. It includes intensive analysis of management’s marketing problems, including market analyses, pricing, channels of distribution, promotion, competition, product strategies, and marketing research. Applications are emphasized to include research, quantitative, and business analytical techniques through the development of case and project assignments.

MKTG 601 Seminar in Consumer Behavior (4)

This course involves intensive analysis of behavioral science concepts, theories, and current empirical research in buyer behavior. The research orientation of the course requires developing an understanding of statistical tests and research designs currently employed in buyer behavior. Equal emphasis is placed on developing creative marketing strategy and programs on the basis of such research. Prerequisite: MKTG 600 or permission of instructor.

MKTG 602 Seminar in Advertising and Public Relations Strategy (4)

This course regards the development of communications strategy necessary to fulfill the objectives of the marketing program through intensive analyses of situational and primary information, target market(s), creative objective(s), media selection and scheduling, sales promotion, public relations, budgeting and program evaluation. It includes qualitative, statistical, financial, and computer applications. The course integrates theory with case analyses and the development of a comprehensive marketing communications plan. Prerequisite: MKTG 600 or permission of the instructor.

MKTG 604 Seminar in Services Marketing (4)

This course is an investigation into and analysis of the complexities and unique aspects of marketing services contrasted to the marketing of tangibles. Special attention will be given to creating effective customer service, demand management, and quality control. The case study method will be utilized.

MKTG 610 Seminar in Global Marketing (4)

This is a study of current global marketing status in industrialized, newly industrialized (NICS) countries, emerging democracies, and the developing world in a dynamic environment of changing communication technologies. Discussion of research techniques one should use in selecting the countries, entry strategies, and developing the right marketing mix and strategies to meet the needs of the countries selected. Marketing management techniques to be used keeping in mind the degree of literacy, economic, legal, political, and socioeconomic environmental variables. Developing and implementing global marketing strategies during the 21st century in an environment in which the countries around the world are grouping into trading blocks like the European Economic Community and NAFTA. Extensive use of library resources, case studies, and empirical research projects.

MKTG 677 Selected Topics in Marketing (4)

Special topic courses provide each department with the opportunity to present an in-depth study of a selected subject not covered in regular courses.When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.

MKTG 699 Individual Graduate Study Marketing (4)

Individual study is offered to give the student experience in planning and outlining a course of study on the student’s own initiative under departmental supervision. Independent study should deal with a special interest not covered in a regular course or with the exploration in greater depth of a subject presented in a regular course. Instructor consent is required. No more than 5 quarter units may be used to satisfy degree requirements. (May not be substituted for any required graduate seminar).

 

Business Administration

BA 690 Master’s Culminating Project (4) [Core]

The culminating project provides an opportunity for each student to utilize and demonstrate the tools and understanding he or she has developed during the program. Through a comprehensive interactive competitive simulation, each student will manage a firm in competition with other student-managed firms. At the completion of the simulation, each student will produce a historical account of the firm’s performance via an annual report, an account of how the firm responds to its key stakeholder groups via a social audit, and a strategic plan for the future via a business plan. Each student is expected to demonstrate mastery of the essential tools of the business disciplines and an understanding of markets and the external environment. Prerequisites: ACCT 620, FIN 600, MGMT 600, 602, 605, 690, MIS 610, MKTG 600.



Meet the Faculty

Emery

John Emery

Dean & M.B.A Interim Director

Ph.D., University of Washington

Phone: (661) 654-2157

Email: jemery@csub.edu

stark

Dr. John Stark

Associate Dean and Associate Professor of Management

Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Phone: (661) 654-2023

Email: jstark@csub.edu

Marketing

JWest

Dr. Jean West

Associate Professor of Marketing

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Phone: (661) 654-2388

Email : jwest10@csub.edu

Management

MAttaran

Dr. Mohsen Attaran

Professor of Management

Ph.D., Portland State University

Phone: (661) 654-2310

Email: mattaran@csub.edu

olson lecture

David Olson

Professor of Management

Ph.D., University of Arizona

Phone: (661) 654-2284

email: dolson@csub.edu

LParis

Dr. Lori Paris

Assistant Professor of Management

M.B.A. California State University, Fresno

Ph.D., New Mexico State University

Phone: (661) 654-6693

Email: lparis@csub.edu


Finance

Dr. Mahdy

Dr. Mahdy Elhusseiny

Associate Professor of Finance

Ph.D., Old Dominion University

Phone: (661) 654-3480

Email: Melhusseiny@csub.edu

Management Information Systems (MIS)

choi

Dr. Yong Choi

Chair and Professor of Management

Associate Professor of MIS

M.B.A Ohio State University

Ph. D. University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Email: Ychoi2@csub.edu

Phone: (661) 654-6776

Accounting

bae

Benjamin Bae

Professor of Accounting

Ph.D., Accounting, Temple University

Email: Bbae@csub.edu

Phone: (661) 654-2140

doucet

Thomas Doucet

Professor of Accounting

Ph.D., University of Georgia

Email: tdoucet@csub.edu

Phone: (661) 654-2337

harvery

Harvey McCown

Professor of Accounting

M.B.A, University of California, Berkeley C.P.A.

Email: hmccown@csub.edu

Phone:(661) 654-6553