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LOWER DIVISION

ENGL 910 Reading and Writing (4)
Designed to improve reasoning, reading, and writing skills
and help students build a strong foundation in these skills for
successful performance in college. This course may be taken
for credit toward full-time status but does not count toward
the baccalaureate degree. This is a sequence course that will
continue in ENGL 1109. Students will be moved together as a
cohort into a section of ENGL 1109 for their second semester.
ENGL 920 Critical Thinking and Writing (3)
Study of rhetorical patterns as critical thinking strategies to
help students develop effective college-level writing skills.
Frequent short papers in a variety of essay modes assigned,
and the fundamentals of grammar, usage, punctuation, and
spelling reviewed as necessary. This is a sequence course that
will continue in ENGL 1109. Students will be moved together
as a cohort into a section of ENGL 1109 for their second
semester. Prerequisite: A total English Placement Test score
between 138 and 146 OR placement into English 920 on the
English Qualifying Exam in Early Start.
ENGL 1109 Writing and Research (3)
Practice in expository writing, focusing on the college research
paper. Includes frequent reading and writing assignments.
Prerequisite: A total English Placement Test score of 147 or
higher; placement into English 1109 on the English Qualifying
Exam in Early Start; a grade of C- or higher in English 910 or
its equivalent; a grade of C- or higher in English 920 or its
equivalent; a score of 500 or above on the critical reading
section of the College Board SAT
Reasoning Test; a score of
22 or above on the American College Testing (ACT) English
Test; a result of “Standard Exceeded-4: Ready for CSU” or
participating CCC college-level coursework in English on the
CAASPP Early Assessment Program (EAP) exam; EAP
English: Standard Met-3 OR SAT Reading: 460-490 OR ACT
English 19-21 plus completion of an approved Senior year
English course (grade of “C” or better) to maintain exemption;
a passing score on the English placement tests for Bakersfield
College or Taft College. Satisfies general education
requirement A2.
ENGL 1208 Introduction to Literature (3)
Introduction to major literary works as they embody traditional
forms and literary devices and as they express enduring themes
in social, historical, or aesthetic contexts. Includes the study
of one or more of the four basic genres (poetry, fiction, drama,
and nonfiction prose). Focus of the course will be indicated
in the class notes section of the class search (e.g. Intro. to
Lit.: Fiction and Non-Fiction, or Intro. to Lit.: Poetry.) Focus
placed on literary terminology and the development of
analytical research skills. Satisfies general education
requirement Area C2.
ENGL 2000 The English Major and Career Opportunities(1)
This course is designed to introduce students to the
requirements and basic methods of the English major. In
addition, it will allow them to explore career opportunities in
a variety of professions, including teaching literature and
language, writing, publishing, editing, public relations,
advertising, law, library science, etc. This course is offered
on a credit, no-credit basis only. Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or
the equivalent.
ENGL 2010 The English Major/Credential Emphasis (1)
Introduction to the English Major with Credential Emphasis
(EMCE), including an examination of the Subject Matter
Requirements (SMRs) for Prospective English Teachers, the
general education and major requirements of the EMCE
program, electronic portfolios, and digital and media literacy.
Provides students with an early field experience. Required
for credential majors. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 2100 Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
Introduction to the theory and practice of creative writing,
including poetry, fiction, and non-fiction prose. Prerequisite:
ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 2208 American Literature Survey I (3)
Survey of selected works of American literature from
colonization to the Civil War, with particular emphasis on
major figures and movements from the early and late colonial,
early national, and romantic periods, including such
subcategories as the literature of exploration, the Puritans,
the American Enlightenment, and the American Renaissance.
This course will focus on the General Education theme of
Revolutionary Ideas and Innovations. Prerequisite: ENGL
1109 or the equivalent. Satisfies general education requirement
Area C2.
ENGL 2210 American Literature Survey II (3)
Survey of selected works of American literature from the Civil
War to the present, tracing the development of American
poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama, with particular
emphasis on major figures and movements such as realism,
naturalism, the literature of the Gilded Age, modernism, and
postmodernism, including such sub-categories as regionalism,
the literature of rural and urban landscape, transcontinental
modernism, and the modern and postmodern avant-garde.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 2220 Ethnic-Minority AmericanLiterature (3)
Introduction to fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama by
African-American, Asian-American, Native-American, and
Latino/a writers in the social contexts out of which their
literature emerges. Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 2308 British Literature Survey I (3)
This course surveys major works of British literature from
the Anglo-Saxon period to the Eighteenth Century (ca. 750-
1750). The emphasis will be on how literature demonstrates
revolutionary ideas and innovations of the culture from which
it emerges. This course will focus on the General Education
theme of Revolutionary Ideas and Innovations. Satisfies
general education requirement Area C2.
ENGL 2310 British Literature Survey II (3)
Survey of major works and major writers from the Restoration
through the modern and contemporary era. Prerequisite:
ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 2408 Introduction to World Literature (3)
An introduction to the study of world literature in English
translation. Texts represent a variety of authors and eras,
cultural contexts, and the major genres (poetry, fiction, and
drama.) Emphasis will be placed on the techniques of
comparative analysis and interpretation. This class highlights
the theme of Fate, Freedom, and Social Responsibility, thus
proposing to fulfill. The Theme of Sustainability and Social
Responsibility of the General Education Requirement. ENGL
2408 is an option among the lower-division requirements for
the English Major in Language and Literature (EMLL), and it
fulfills AREA C2 of the Arts and Humanities General
Education Program. Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the
equivalent. Satisfies general education requirement Area C2.
ENGL 2410 Masterpieces Western World Literature (3)
Representative masterworks from key periods of Western
culture from the Greeks to the Renaissance and from the
Enlightenment to the Present (including all the major genres
poetry, fiction, and drama) studied from the vantage point of
both their historical significance and their enduring aesthetic
significance. Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL/COMM 2518 Introduction to Film Studies (3)
An introduction to the richness and diversity of cinema’s past
and present through close viewing and active discussion of
American and international films. Students learn about key
critical approaches, cinematic innovation, and the foundations
of cinematic language (including narrative, editing, sound,
cinematography, and acting) in order to actively “read” movies
within social, historical and aesthetic contexts. Prerequisite:
ENGL 1109 or its equivalent. Satisfies general education
requirement Area C2.
ENGL/LING 2608 Introduction to Language Study (3)
Introduction to language study will emphasize quality of life
issues through the examination of the universality of language
as a uniquely human trait; as a mark of social, ethnic, national,
and psychological identities; a means of expressing aesthetic
experiences and social interconnectedness; and a means for
socio-economic advancement and life satisfaction. Includes
the nature of human language, major components of language
and linguistics, appropriate linguistic mediums for different
human expressions, and variation in language according to
different social, educational, racial, and gender backgrounds.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the equivalent. Satisfies general
education requirement Area D.
ENGL 2700 Experiential Prior Learning (3)
Evaluation and assessment of learning which has occurred as
a result of prior off-campus experience relevant to the
curriculum of the department. Requires complementary
academic study and/or documentation. Available by petition
only, on a credit, no-credit basis. Not open to postgraduate
students. Interested students should contact the department
office.
ENGL 2800 Individual Study (3)
Special projects developed by the individual student in
consultation with the designated instructor. Admission with
consent of department chair.
Upper Division


UPPER DIVISION

UPPER DIVISION
ENGL 3000 Critical Approaches to Literature (3)
Introduction to various critical approaches and aesthetic
theories used in the study of literature. This survey may
include, but is not limited to, a history of literary aesthetics
from the classical to modern periods, and/or contemporary
theoretical paradigms that are influential in literary studies
today. Twentieth and twenty-first century approaches may
include historicist (old and new), traditional humanist,
formalist, deconstructionist, psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxist,
postcolonial, among others. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the
equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220,
2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3010 Teaching High School English Language Arts (3)
Provides pre-service teachers with background knowledge,
theoretical foundations, and pedagogical skills essential to
develop a principled framework of practice that reflects a deep
understanding about teaching and learning in the High School
English Language Arts classroom. This course is required for
all students in the English single-subject program, the English
Major with Credential Emphasis (EMCE). The course is open
only to students in the EMCE program. Prerequisite: Grade
of “C” or higher in ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 3109 Modes of Writing (3)
An online course in effective expository writing. Emphasis
on writing as a process. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher
in ENGL 1109 or its equivalent and upper division standing.
Satisfies general education requirement GWAR.
ENGL 3119 Advanced Writing (3)
Comprehensive study of the techniques of effective expository
writing with emphasis on the development of prose style.
Frequent writing exercises, both in and out of class.
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in ENGL 1109 or its
equivalent and upper-division standing. Satisfies general
education requirement Junior Year Diversity Requirement
JYDR and GWAR.
ENGL 3128 Writing Literary Analysis (3)
Intensive development of writing skills in English as a
discipline, specifically literary analysis and criticism. Practice
in writing about literature, nonfiction, and film using the basic
principles of close reading, formalist attention to literary
techniques and structure, and appropriate critical approaches.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or its equivalent and upper-division
standing. Satisfies general education requirement GWAR.
ENGL 3200 Civil War to World War I (3)
A study of selected poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama from
the 1600s to 1914, with particular emphasis on major figures
and movements from, for example, the early and late colonial,
early national, romantic periods, realism, naturalism, and the
literature of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one course from
ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3210 Major American Authors: 20th Century (3)
A study of selected poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama from
1900 to the present, with particular emphasis on major figures,
as well as movements such as late naturalism, modernism,
and postmodernism. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the
equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220,
2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3220 Studies Fiction: African-American Experience (3)
Intensive examination of African-American experience as
portrayed in slave and contemporary African-American
Literature, fiction and critical essays using various critical
approaches (e.g., multicultural, postcolonial, mythological,
historical, and formalist). Such themes as slavery, alienation,
religion, and triumph of the spirit will be explored. As we
discuss African-American experience in the selected fiction,
we will also be engaged in comparative analysis of the images
of Blacks presented in selected major non-Western literatures.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one course from
ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3230 Studies in Chicano Literature (3)
Examination of the experiences of Chicana and Chicano
writers as portrayed in their fiction, drama, poetry, and film
and as interpreted by current ethnic literary theory. Course
also includes study of the socio-cultural milieu from which
the literature emerged. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the
equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220,
2228, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3248 Ethnic Literatures (3)
ENGL 3248 focuses on the experiences of writers who are
concerned with the issues of race, ethnicity, and gender in
their non-fiction, short fiction, poetry, novels, autobiographical
essays, aesthetic and political manifestoes, and the hybrid
genres produced by their creative energy. Course content—
which varies from semester to semester—centers on two
fundamental questions: first, how an author’s race/ethnicity/
gender influence what he/she writes. Second, how literature
exposes the social construction of race and its impact on quality
of life. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one
course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408,
or 2410. Satisfies general education Quality of Life and upper
division Area C.
ENGL 3250 Literature by Women of Color (3)
An extensive examination of the experiences of women of
color both in the U.S. and abroad as portrayed in their fiction,
nonfiction, and poetry and as interpreted in feminist and ethnic
literary theory and criticism. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the
equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220,
2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410. Satisfies general education Quality
of Life and upper division Area C.
ENGL 3268 Writing Nature: Literature and the Environment (3)
This course explores the intersection between literature and
nature, looking closely at such issues as literary interpretations
of the land, the imposition of cultural/ideological influences
on the representation of nature, narratives of exploration and
discovery, and the importance of gender, race, and ethnicity
in a literary relationship to nature. In addition to literary texts,
course readings may include essays, histories, diaries, letters,
film, and photographic collections. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208
or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210,
2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410. Satisfies general education
Sustainability and Justice upper division Area C.
ENGL 3300 Medieval English Literature: 450-1500 (3)
English literature from the beginning to the close of the Middle
Ages. Old English poetry in translation, including Beowulf
and shorter poems; Middle English prose and poetry exclusive
of Chaucer, such as works of the Gawain poet, anonymous
lyrics, Malory; the beginnings of the English drama.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one course from
ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3310 Chaucer (3)
Selections from The Canterbury Tales and shorter poems and/
or Troilus and Criseyde. Since the works are read in the
original Middle English, some attention is given to the nature
and development of the English language in the Middle Ages.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one course from
ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3320 Renaissance English Literature: 1500-1660 (3)
Provides an overview of the literary genres and generic
developments of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.
Focusing upon major writers such as Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser,
Lanyer, Donne, and Herbert, this course explores the
relationship between their imaginative achievements and the
literary, religious, and political contexts in which these works
were written and read. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the
equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220,
2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3330 Shakespeare I (3)
This course introduces students to Shakespeare’s literary and
theatrical world. Class may include lecture; discussion; video
recordings; local productions; analysis of themes, sources,
language and other traditional literary approaches; in-class
acting exercises; and selected performance aspects (such as
blocking, staging, costumes, and set design). Selected readings
in the tragedies, comedies, and histories. Prerequisite: ENGL
1208 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208,
2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3340 Milton (3)
This course traces John Milton’s evolution as a writer in order
to track the various religious, political, and literary influences
upon his work. This study of Milton culminates in selected
readings from his greatest work, Paradise Lost. Prerequisite:
ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100,
2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3350 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature: 1660-1785 (3)
Literature of Neoclassicism and of sensibility in England.
Satire, drama, poetry, the novel, the essay. Selected studies in
Dryden, Behn, Congreve, Finch, Swift, Pope, Montagu,
Addison and Steele, Richardson, Johnson, Gray, Cowper, and
others. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one
course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408,
or 2410.
ENGL 3360 Romantic English Literature: 1798-1837 (3)
The literature of the ‘age of revolution’s in England,
Romanticism, and/or Victorian literature, and the social and
cultural contexts out of which it evolved. Prerequisite: ENGL
1208 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208,
2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3370 Modern English Literature: 1901-1945 (3)
This course may focus on British literature during one half of
or the entire twentieth century, from the literature of the
Edwardian and Georgian period in post-Victorian England,
including major Irish and postcolonial authors, to the literature
of the post-World War II era. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the
equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220,
2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3400 Contemporary World Literature (3)
Major later-twentieth-century/contemporary literary works
from around the world, written in English and also in
translation. Emphasis on works written outside of the United
States and Britain. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent
or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308,
2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3410 Gender in Literature and Film (3)
A criticism and theory-based exploration of literature and film
from the standpoint of gender in relation to class, race,
ethnicity, and sexuality. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the
equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220,
2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3420 World Mythology (3)
A survey of the various kinds of mythical discourse throughout
the world and the changing nature of ‘myth’ itself. The
recurrence of ancient myths in modern thought and literature
is stressed. Mythology of the Greeks and Romans will be
emphasized as found in Homer, Virgil, Ovid and other
Classical writers. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent
or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308,
2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3430 Selected Readings in Western and Non- Western Literature I (3)
Study of representative works of world literature from the
earliest literature to the present. The course focuses on the
literary and cultural significance of selected great works in
Western and non-Western literary traditions. The broad aim
of the course is to highlight universal themes and to identify
the historical and cultural contexts that give specificity to each
work. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one course
from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or
2410.
ENGL 3440 International Folk Narrative (3)
Survey of the various genres of oral narratives and an
examination of their historical and social significance as well
as their influence on literature. Emphasis on studying the
universal motifs of folk narratives and contrasting the folk
narratives of different cultures. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or
the equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210,
2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 3510 History of Film (3)
This course offers an institutional, aesthetic, cultural and
political history of motion pictures across the world, from the
pre-history of the medium to the contemporary moment.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 3518 Special Topics in Film Studies (3)
The “New Hollywood” movement, sometimes called the
“American New Wave,” was an unprecedented chapter in the
U.S. film industry. A new generation of filmmakers, influenced
by innovative European and Asian cinema and marked by the
social upheaval—Vietnam, Watergate, civil rights protests,
women’s liberation, the sexual revolution, sex, drugs, rock
and roll and so on—sought to make films that were artistically
ambitious and socially relevant. For a dozen or so years, New
Hollywood filmmakers produced several daring, exciting
movies that challenged the narrative and stylistic norms of
classic Hollywood. Satisfies general education Quality of Life
and upper division Area C.
ENGL/LING 3600 Structure of English (3)
Systematic examination of Modern English phonology,
morphology and syntax. Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the
equivalent.
ENGL/LING 3610 General Linguistics (3)
Basic concepts, theories, and issues in the study of language,
with emphasis on the sound system, principles of word
formation, and the semantic and syntactic patterns of English.
Consideration is given to first and second language acquisition
and the relationship between language and culture.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 3620 Language Structure Acquisition K-8 Teachers(3)
Systematic examination of the structure of Modern English
with emphasis on phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics
and pragmatics. Also covers first and second language
acquisition by children. Course materials also address recent
policies and standards as they impact the elementary language
arts classroom.
ENGL 3630 Experience Reading/Writing K-8 Teachers (3)
This course is designed to explore the fundamentals of
developing literacy as a foundation for effective literacy
instruction at the K-8 grade levels. Students will develop a
basic knowledge of literacy development, including phonemic
awareness, phonics, vocabulary development and
comprehension of texts. Students will also gain knowledge of
the theoretical underpinnings of both the reading and writing
process, as well as an understanding of assessment methods
and instruments for early literacy. Course materials will also
address recent policies and standards as they impact the
elementary language arts classroom.
ENGL 3640 Writing in a Second Language (3)
The writing process and the written products of people
composing in English as a second (or third, fourth, etc.)
language. Topics of discussion include contrastive analysis,
error analysis, and evaluation. Special attention will be given
to the writing problems of international students learning
English and to appropriate instructional procedures helpful
to such students. Prerequisites: ENGL/LING 2608, 3600 or
3610.
ENGL 3650 Second Language Acquisition (3)
This class discusses the conscious and unconscious processes
of learning a second language after the first language has
already been acquired, and examines some of the major
theories that have been advanced to support second language
acquisition. These theories include cognitive style,
interlanguage, linguistic universals, and acculturation.
ENGL 4100 Creative Writing (3)
Experimental writing, investigation, and discussion of creative
writing and the creative process, with individual and group
analysis of student work. Course may focus on poetry, fiction,
non-fiction, drama, or more than one of these. Prerequisite:
ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100,
2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 4400 Children Literature for K-8 Teachers (3)
This course will consider novels, poetry, folktales and fairy
tales, and drama as they are represented in various cultures
through children’s literature. Using principles of literary
analysis, it will focus on the selection of literature for children
to read and will also consider teaching plans to help students
read literary texts with understanding and pleasure. Texts
will include works by Blake, Dickens, Baum, Lowry, and
Barrie.
ENGL 4410 Studies in 19th Century Children Literature (3)
This course studies nineteenth-century literature written for
children but also addressed to adults. The course will focus
on escapism versus realism, male versus female authors, and
the social and cultural contexts out of which nineteenth-century
children’s literature evolved. Authors studied may include
Lewis Carroll, Charles Kingsley, and Frances Hodgson
Burnett. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one
course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408,
or 2410.
ENGL 4420 Studies in 20th Century Children Literature (3)
This course studies twentieth-century literature written for
children but also addressed to adults. It will explore realism
and fantasy, social allegory, and the motif of the quest or
journey. Authors studied may include Frank Baum, C.S. Lewis,
and J.R.R. Tolkien. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent
or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308,
2310, 2408, or 2410.

ENGL 4430 The Young Adult Novel (3)
This course studies fiction written for young adults. It will
trace the development of literature specifically aimed at young
adults and consider major historical and cultural events that
shaped the literature. The course will explore mythology and
archetypes, moral and literary codes, and the social contexts
out of which young adult literature evolved. Works covered
will include texts by such authors such as Louisa M. Alcott,
Willa Cather, and J.D. Salinger. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or
the equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210,
2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410.
ENGL 4440 Children’s Literature and International Myth,
Folk Tale, and Film (3)
This course will examine myths, folk tales, and films from
diverse countries and the ways in which they express and shape
collective values. Works covered include fairy tales, the oral
tradition, fables within and outside the main Western tradition,
and films. Prerequisite: ENGL 1208 or the equivalent or one
course from ENGL 2100, 2208, 2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408,
or 2410.
ENGL 4600 Morphology (3)
Morphology is the branch of linguistics dealing with the
analysis of word structure. The course examines the common
word-formation processes of inflection, derivation, infixing,
compounding, and reduplication within the context of the
lexical, metrical, and prosodic theoretical approaches.
Emphasis is also placed on the interrelationship between
morphology, the lexicon, phonology, and syntax. Prerequisite:
ENGL/LING 3600 or 3610, or the equivalent.
ENGL 4610 Phonology (3)
Analysis of phonetics and phonology including distinctive
features, patterns, systems, and processes of language within
the framework of current generative phonological approach.
Examples will be drawn from English and other languages.
Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 3600, 3610, 4650 or the equivalent.
ENGL 4620 Syntax (3)
This course provides an introduction to generative syntactic
theory. Students will learn to draw tree diagrams and write
transformation rules for sentences according to Chomsky’s
Aspects model. Toward the end of the course, students will
learn the basic principles of the Government-Binding model.
There will be a heavy emphasis on analyzing syntactic data-
some from languages other than English. Prerequisite: ENGL/
LING 3600, 3610, 4650 or the equivalent.
ENGL 4630 Semantics and Pragmatics (3)
Semantics deals with word-level and sentence-level meaning,
while pragmatics is concerned with language use in different
contexts and the reasons speakers vary their language in
particular ways. Emphasis is placed on discovering how
semantic and pragmatic structure interface with syntax,
examining the systematic ways in which languages structure
and encode meaning in words, sentences, and longer stretches
of discourse. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 2608 or 3600 or 3610
or the equivalent.
ENGL 4648 Sociolinguistics (3)
Examination of the relationship between language and such
social variables as sex, economic class, race, and ethnicity.
Topics include social dialects, linguistic stereotypes, code-
switching, and the educational challenges of language
minorities. A thorough linguistic comparison between one non-
standard dialect and Standard American English will be
included. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 2608 or 3600 or 3610
or permission of instructor. Satisfies general education Quality
of Life and upper division Area D.
ENGL/LING 4650 History of the Language (3)
The development of English phonology, morphology, syntax,
spelling, and vocabulary from the Old English period to the
present. Prerequisite: ENGL 1109 or the equivalent.
ENGL 4660 Historical Linguistics (3)
Historical linguistics examines language change at different
levels, including phonological, morphological, syntactic,
semantic, and lexical change. The course also discusses such
concepts as language contact and borrowing, comparative
language reconstruction, language relatedness, and language
families. Examples will be drawn from both Indo-European
and non-Indo-European languages. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING
3600, 3610, 4650 or the equivalent.
ENGL 4708 Studies in Fiction (3)
A course focusing on the historical development and formal
features of a particular genre, such as the novel, the short story,
poetry, drama, the gothic, folklore, epic, the Bible, etc. Specific
works to be determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Upper-
division status and completion of General Education Areas A
and C. Completion or concurrent enrollment in a Junior-year
Diversity Reflection course is also required. GE Area C,
Theme R, and Writing and Critical Thinking Reinforcement.
Satisfies general education Revolutionary Ideas and
Innovations upper division Area C.
ENGL 4710 Topics in Literature (3)
Focused study of a particular theme or genre in literature.
Specific topic determined by instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL
1208 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 2100, 2208,
2210, 2220, 2308, 2310, 2408, or 2410. May be repeated for
different course content.
ENGL 4720 Experiential Prior Learning (3)
Evaluation and assessment of learning which has occurred as
a result of prior off-campus experience relevant to the
curriculum of the department. Requires complementary
academic study and/or documentation. Available by petition
only, on a credit, no-credit basis. Not open to post-graduate
students. Interested students should contact the department
office.
ENGL 4730 Cooperative Education (3)
The Cooperative Education program offers a sponsored
learning experience in a work setting, integrated with a field
analysis seminar. The field experience is contracted by the
Cooperative Education office on an individual basis, subject
to approval by the department. The field experience, including
the seminar and reading assignments, is supervised by the
cooperative education coordinator and the faculty liaison (or
course instructor), working with the field supervisor. The
determination of course credits, evaluation, and grading are
the responsibility of the departmental faculty. Offered on a
credit, no-credit basis only.
ENGL 4800 Directed Study in the Instruction of English (3)
A class in the theory and method of undergraduate instruction
in English. Weekly meetings with faculty sponsor and
supervised experience which may include developing,
administering, and scoring examinations; leading small group
discussions; tutoring; and directing students in researching
term papers. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor who will serve as the
sponsor and approval by chair of the Department of English.
ENGL 4810 Individual Study (3)
Special projects developed by the individual student in
consultation with the designated instructor. Admission with
consent of department chair.
ENGL 4890 Experiential Prior Learning (1-3)
Evaluation and assessment of learning which has occurred as
a result of prior off-campus experience relevant to the
curriculum of the department. Requires complementary
academic study and/or documentation. Available by petition
only, on a credit, no-credit basis. Not open to postgraduate
students. Interested students should contact the department
office.
ENGL 4908 Senior Seminar (3)
A capstone seminar concerned with the integration and
consideration of the English major, both in itself and within
the broader context of a university education. The course will
explore relationships of various courses and traditions
considered within the major, or other more focused special
topics such as an in-depth exploration of a specific author or
literary group. The course will also explore relationships
between English and other academic disciplines. Prerequisites:
ENGL 3000, and senior standing, and/or consent of instructor.
Satisfies general education requirement Capstone.
ENGL 4918 Senior Seminar for Prospective Teachers (3)
This course is designed to provide prospective English-
Language Arts teachers with a capstone course which draws
upon their experiences, both within the English major and
within the broader context of a university education, and offers
them the opportunity to demonstrate their competence, in
relation to Subject Matter Requirements (SMRs) for
Prospective English Teachers and the Common Core State
Standards in English-Language Arts for California Public
Schools. In addition, students will examine how the
components of technology are integrated into the English-
Language Arts classroom. The course will also explore
relationships between English-Language Arts and other
academic disciplines. Prerequisite: ENGL 3010 and senior
standing and/or consent of the instructor. Satisfies general
education requirement Capstone.