BPA Course Descriptions ( All course descriptions are listed alphabetically)

Accounting

ACCT 220 Introduction to Financial Reporting and Accounting (5)

This course introduces students to basic features of financial accounting systems with emphasis on the accounting cycle and the preparation of financial statements for both corporations and sole proprietorships. 

ACCT 221 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (5)

This course introduces students to basic features of internal reporting systems with an emphasis on decision making.  Following a review of the financial accounting cycle, budgeting for planning and control will be stressed with emphasis on cash management, working capital management, inventory management, product costing, cost volume profit analysis, and cost allocation.  Prerequisite:  ACCT 220.

ACCT 275 Business Law (5)

This course provides an overview of legal principles that affect commercial transactions and a basic framework for analyzing the legal dimensions of business practices and operations.  Topics include contract law, E-contracts, UCC sale of goods, property law, torts, constitutional and administrative law, partnership and corporate law, and ethics.

ACCT 300 Intermediate Accounting I (5)

This course provides an intensive study of basic financial accounting theory, financial statements, the accounting cycle, working capital accounts, and operational assets.  It also extensively covers revenue recognition concepts.  Prerequisite:  ACCT 221.

ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting II (5)

This course is the continuation of the study of financial accounting theory from Intermediate Accounting I.  Specific topics covered include long-term liabilities, stockholders’ equity, accounting changes, error analysis, cash flow and accounting for income taxes, leases and pension costs.  Prerequisite:  ACCT 300.  Strongly recommended:  FIN 300.

ACCT 303 Managerial Accounting (5)

This course provides an intensive study of cost accumulation systems for manufacturing and service enterprises.  Emphasis is on managerial cost analysis and management decision making.  Prerequisite:  ACCT 221.

ACCT 325 Fundamentals of Tax – Individuals (5)

This course is an introduction to US Income Taxation with the focus on taxation of individuals.  It starts with the tax laws and related research sources.  It then covers the basics of gross income, income exclusions, deductions, tax rates, credits, and collection methods.  Specific subjects include basis of assets, depreciation, taxation of sales and exchanges, loss limitations and alternative minimum tax.  The students will also learn how to hand-write individual income tax returns.  Prerequisites: ACCT 220.

ACCT 326 Fundamentals of Tax – Business (5)

This course is an introduction to the US Income Taxation of Business Entities.  It starts with a brief summary of the laws and related research sources.  The main objective is to understand the difference between treatment for taxation purposes and for financial statement reporting.  This includes the typical income and expense items as well as special items such as depreciation, research and development, non-deductible items, loss limitations, carry-overs, alternative minimum tax, and tax credits.  Coverage will also include the differing tax treatment of partnerships, LLC’s and S corporations.  Prerequisites: ACCT 220

ACCT 360 Accounting Information Systems (5)

This course covers general systems concepts and theory, with an emphasis on internal controls.  It includes the collection and processing of accounting information, internal control aspects of accounting systems, systems life cycle in an accounting framework, and the interface of accounting systems and computer technology. Prerequisite: ACCT 221.

ACCT 370 Agribusiness Accounting (5)

This course addresses accounting issues unique to agribusiness.  Topics to be covered include: review of basic accounting concepts from the perspective of agribusiness, income taxes, management reports and data sources in agriculture, budgeting, financing, and ratio analysis. Students will learn the differences between cash accounting, accrual accounting, and crop/field accounting.  They will also learn what method is most useful for different objectives such as field/crop management, overall farm management, overall farm reporting, tax reporting, reports for lenders, and reports for owners/shareholders. Cross listed with AGBS 370. Prerequisite:  ACCT 221.

ACCT 400 Advanced and International Accounting (5)

This course addresses advanced topics in accounting and will include coverage of a number of the following topics: special problems of accounting for business combinations, reorganizations, bankruptcies, partnerships, governmental and nonprofit organizations, trusts and estates, and international accounting.  It will include discussion of the current issues related to the global harmonization of accounting standards (International Financial Reporting Standards) and the impact on the accounting profession. Prerequisite:  ACCT 301.

ACCT 408 Auditing (5)

This course covers the fundamentals of auditing theory and practice, ethical standards, auditing standards, auditing techniques, and the audit report; special emphasis is placed on independent audits by CPAs and the role of CPAs in society.  Prerequisites:  ACCT 301 and 360.

ACCT 450/650 Accounting Ethics (5)

This course will focus on the unique issues and obligations of professional accountants.  We will begin this study with a discussion of why accounting ethics matters and why students should study ethics at this point in their academic career.  Further, students will examine what it means to be a professional accountant and will discuss what virtues accountants must possess to best serve the public interest.  Students will study the language of ethics and will be able to distinguish between principles and rules.  High profile cases will be used to demonstrate the failings of the profession and individual accountants. An in-depth study of ethical standards for the various professional accounting organizations at the national and state levels will enable students to understand the ethical framework from which they will operate as professional accountants.  Prerequisites: ACCT 301 or graduate standing.

ACCT 475 Business Law II

This second course in business law expands application of legal principles that affect commercial transactions and further develops the basic framework for analyzing the legal dimensions of business practices and operations.  Topics include: employment and labor law issues; consumer law; antitrust law; insurance law; wills and trusts; mortgages; secured transactions; suretyship; debtor – creditor relationships; bankruptcy law; federal securities regulations; criminal law; negotiable instruments; international law; environmental law; computers and the law; and professional liability and accountability. Prerequisite: ACCT 275.

ACCT 477 Special Topics in Accounting (1-5)

Special topics course in Accounting provides students with the opportunity to take an in-depth study of an area not covered in regular courses.  When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course. 

ACCT 496 Internship in Accounting (1-5)

This course provides an integrated academic experience in a work setting.  Units may not be used to satisfy the requirements of the Business Administration major.  Students may earn a maximum of 5 units through internships.  It is offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

Agricultural Business

AGBS 271 Principles of Agricultural Law

A survey of legal issues and principles of practical concern that is applicable to transactions in agribusinesses.  This foundation course introduces fundamentals of laws, regulations, and government practices affecting farming enterprises and related agriculture service and product industries, and addresses ethical principles associated with agricultural activities.  Topics include government relationships; compliance requirements; contracts; tort liability; property law; employment law; and legal issues pertaining to agricultural cooperatives, soil, water, animals, and crops.

AGBS 350 Agricultural Management (5)

Core management concepts and theories applied to agribusiness. Topics include individual dynamics (motivation, values); planning (demand, forecasts, budgets); organizing (strategy, structure, change); leadership (power, influence, negotiation, human resources); and control (product/inventory, financial management). Cross listed with MGMT 350.

AGBS 351 Agricultural Marketing (5)

Core marketing concepts applied to agriculture and the food system.  Considers the conceptual foundations of effective marketing and industry practices by growers, processors and packagers, and intermediaries such as wholesalers, distributors, brokers, agents, and retailers. Imparts a forward-looking global perspective by incorporating research findings, technology trends, and international marketing strategies.  Incorporates business cases, simulated decision scenarios, guest speakers, and field projects involving local enterprises. Ethical issues are considered and marketing strategies analyzed in the context of customer objectives and stakeholder concerns. Cross listed with MKTG 351.

AGBS 370 Agribusiness Accounting (5)

This course addresses accounting issues unique to agribusiness.  Topics to be covered include: review of basic accounting concepts from the perspective of agribusiness, income taxes, management reports and data sources in agriculture, budgeting, financing, and ratio analysis. Students will learn the differences between cash accounting, accrual accounting, and crop/field accounting.  They will also learn what method is most useful for different objectives such as field/crop management, overall farm management, overall farm reporting, tax reporting, reports for lenders, and reports for owners/shareholders. Cross listed with ACCT 370. Prerequisite:  ACCT 221.

AGBS 371  Economics of Agriculture and Natural Resources (5)

Economic policy analysis of agriculture and natural resources with emphasis on California agriculture. Topics include the structure and organization of U.S.’s agriculture and food system, specifically the operation, financing, linkages, and functions of its components; the economic aspects of a wide range of environmental issues including air and water pollution, optimal forest and fisheries management; recycling; cost-benefit policy analysis case studies; and international issues. Cross listed with ECON 371. Prerequisite: ECON 201.

AGBS 372 Agricultural Trade Policy (5)

An introduction to practical considerations of agricultural trade and trade policy analysis.  Emphasis is placed on concepts of agricultural trade, analysis of trade policies of major trading partners and the export/import marketing of agricultural products.  Also the interdependencies between the world’s food, populations and equitability/poverty problems and possible solutions are explored.  Cross listed with ECON 372. Prerequisite:  ECON 201.

AGBS 373 Agricultural Finance (5)

The objective of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to evaluate and manage risk in the agricultural industry. This course provides an introduction to the economic theory, organization, and operating principles of agricultural commodity futures markets in the U.S.  Emphasis is placed on speculating, hedging, and investing in agricultural commodity futures contracts from the standpoint of the agribusiness entrepreneur. Capital theory is also visited.  Cross listed as ECON 373. Prerequisites:  ECON 201, MATH 140, ECON 220 or equivalent; or permission of instructor.

AGBS 496 Internship in Agribusiness (1-5 units)

Internships may be arranged by the department with various agencies or businesses. Prerequisite: permission of program coordinator who will determine credits and application of credit. May be repeated. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

Business Administration

BA 100 Perspectives in Business (5)

Using a combination of lecture, discussion, and activity-based participation, this course provides students with an introduction to business.  The course provides an introductory view of the core disciplines of business including management, finance, accounting, marketing, research and development, human resource management, production and operations management, information management, strategic management, and business environment.  The course applies these disciplines to entrepreneurs and small business owners, corporations, and to other organizations.  Open to all non-business majors and may be applied to satisfying the requirements for the minor in business administration.

BA 270 Legal Environment of Domestic and International Business (5)

Introduction of legal principles and issues relevant to transacting business.  Ethical, social, constitutional, and political influences and controls are integrated within the course materials as part of the legal environment approach.  Topics include concepts of the legal process; judicial and administrative practices; forms and structure of business organizations; and legal components of contracts, torts, property, human resources concerns, and international business.  

BA 290 Introduction to Business Professions (3)

This course provides an introduction to the business professions, including an overview of business operations and ethics, exposure to the variety of careers in business, and development of key skills necessary for success in the business curriculum. Skill development focuses on communications (writing, oral, teamwork) and critical thinking. The student is introduced to rubrics used to evaluate learning goals and objectives for the business major. The course is intended for business majors. Note: For business administration majors, BA 290 must be completed with a C or better (not C-) to enroll in upper division core courses. For first-quarter transfer majors who can otherwise enroll in upper division core courses, BA 290 is a co-requisite.  Note: Transfer Business majors who have completed the lower division core courses and at least 90 quarter units must take BA 290 as a co-requisite with their first upper division core course.

BA 300 Diversity in Business Organizations (5)

The course focus is an exploration of the cultural diversity in business and at work today.  This course encompasses the entire spectrum of basic cultural theory, the cultural impacts on business, and six major cultural groups.  Topics covered will include doing business with North Americans, Latin Americans, Asians, Europeans, Africans, and Middle Easterners. GRE 

BA 301 Data Analysis and Decision Making (5)

An introduction to the application of statistical and quantitative methods using computer technology to examine and explore data and to build and interpret models to aid in business decision making in all functional areas.  Methods covered include:  summarizing and exploring data, probability concepts, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, regression analysis, simulation, decision theory, and optimization.

BA 374 Business and Society (5)

Focuses on the interrelationships between society, business, and government. Considers those situations where the market system fails to solve problems that society deems important.  Topics include ecological impact of technology, and the relationship of technology to employment and quality of work life, consumerism, ethics, and corporate social responsibility. GE T3 

BA 393 Intercollegiate Business Competitions (2)

This course provides academic credit for participation in various intercollegiate competitions offered under the direction of the faculty of the School of Business and Public Administration.  Academic credit can be earned for up to three consecutive quarters for those competitions extending beyond a single quarter (i.e., up to six units per academic year).  Most competitions extend over two or three quarters, including preparation and practice.  The activity is graded on a credit-no credit basis.  Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

BA 396 Human Corps (1)

One unit of credit for 30 or more hours of volunteer community service experience working directly with people in a business related, nonprofit, governmental, or community based organization, including educational institutions.  Open to students with appropriate business background for the particular position.  The student may suggest a suitable placement or request an assignment from the Human Corps office.  A journal, a brief reflective paper, and occasional meetings with a faculty sponsor are required.  Only one unit of Human Corps credit may be earned per term, and no more than 12 units of all Human Corps credit may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree.  Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

BA 428 Small Business Consulting (5)

Students are assigned as consultants to a small firm in the business community to assist owner clients in marketing, finance, accounting, operations, MIS, personnel and strategic management, as appropriate.  Students are supervised by faculty and provide oral and written reports to the client to conclude the consultation.  Prerequisite:  senior standing and permission of Business Research Education Center Director.

BA 477 Special Topics in Business (1-5)

Special topics courses provide each department with the opportunity to present an in-depth study of a selected subject not covered in regular courses.  When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.  Each department will determine applicability toward individual concentrations.

BA 489 Experiential Prior Learning (1-20)

Evaluation and assessment of learning that has occurred as a result of prior off-campus experience relevant to the curriculum of the department.  Course requires complementary academic study and/or documentation.  Available by petition only on a credit, no-credit basis.  Not open to post-baccalaureate students.  BA 489 units may not be used for credit with the BS in Business Administration, BA in Public Administration, MS, MBA or MPA degrees.  Interested students should contact the BPA Student Services Center for further details.

BA 490 Senior Seminar in Business Administration (5)

This is a terminal integrating course.  The course serves dual purposes.  The first is to introduce students to strategic management.  The objective here is to see and practice how strategic decisions are made.  Strategic management topics include external environments, industry and competitor analyses, resources and capabilities, corporate governance, strategy formulation, strategy implementation, strategy controls, mergers and acquisitions, strategic alliances and coalitions, and strategic corporate social responsibility.  The second purpose is to integrate the tools of strategic management with the other core disciples of the business major in order to understand and to make wise decision and ethical strategic decisions.  Prerequisites:  BA 370, 374, FIN 300, MGMT 300, 301, 302, MIS 300 and MKTG 300.  BA 490 normally is taken in the last term before graduation.

BA 497 Cooperative Education (1-5)

The Cooperative Education Program provides a sponsored learning experience in a work setting, integrated with a field analysis seminar.  The field experience, including the seminar and reading assignments, is supervised by the cooperative education coordinator and a faculty liaison working with the field supervisor.  May not be used to satisfy the requirements of the Business Administration major.  Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

BA 499 Individual Study (1-5)

Individual study is offered as an opportunity for the student to design a course of study dealing with a particular area of interest within a discipline, to research the subject area and present an in-depth study for review.  Student works under the direct supervision of a faculty member who must approve the study prior to its implementation.

Economics

ECON 100 Economic Way of Thinking (5)

Introduction to economic analysis.  Topics covered include microeconomic theory and application and macroeconomic theory and policy.  Also, an in-depth study of into selected topics and current events.  GE D2

ECON 105 Personal Economics (5)

This course covers personal economic and financial planning problems that individuals and families encounter during the course of their lives. Topics include saving and investment decisions, insurance needs, income taxation, job opportunity analysis, current economic conditions, portfolio and credit management, and retirement planning. This activity-oriented course will incorporate simulations of the Stock Market.  GE D2

ECON 201 Essentials of Microeconomics (5)

Value and distribution theory, including the theory of household behavior, the theory of the firm, and the pricing of factors of production.  Emphasis on tools of economic thinking and the historical development of these tools.  GE D2 

ECON 202 Essentials of Macroeconomics (5)

Theories of income, employment, and price level.  Introduction to balance of payments accounts and adjustments and exchange rate determination. Monetary and fiscal stabilization policies.  Emphasis on tools of economic thinking and the historical development of these tools.  GE D2 

ECON 210 Analyzing Economic Data (2)

This course familiarizes students with the major information and data sources used to monitor economic trends at the international, national, regional, industry, and occupational levels. Students will locate and download data from important sources and utilize spreadsheets to organize and analyze the data, charts trends, and concisely summarize findings.

ECON 220 Quantitative Tools for Economists (5)

This course introduces and applies quantitative tools within economic contexts. Functional representations of economic properties (e.g., linearity, rates of growth and decay, continuous compounding and annualized growth rates, saturation thresholds, elasticity, marginal relationships, returns to scale) and economic interpretations of functional parameters. Geometric series (e.g., financial formulas, spending and money supply multipliers). Matrix methods (e.g., modeling simultaneous systems of endogenous variables, structural and reduced form coefficients, input-output methods, demographic forecasting). Differential calculus (e.g., profit maximization and cost minimization, constrained optimization and shadow prices, inventory and money demand models, curve fitting and least squares estimation). Prerequisite: MATH 85 or satisfaction of ELM requirement.

ECON 277 Contemporary Economic Issues (5)

An overview of the essentials of business economics. Topics include the economic way of thinking, market mechanism, money and banking, stabilization policy, market structure, economic role of government, human resource and operations management, human capital investment, international trade, marketing and business development, and social responsibility of business enterprises.

ECON 289 Experiential Prior Learning (variable units)

Evaluation and assessment of learning, which has occurred as a result of prior off-campus experience relevant to the curriculum of the department. Requires complementary academic study and/or documentation.  Available by petition only, on a credit, no-credit basis.  Not open to postgraduate students.  Interested students should contact the department office.

ECON 301 Microeconomic Theory and Applications (5)

Theory construction and application in the areas of consumer choice and demand, production and cost, competitive markets, general equilibrium, and welfare economics.  “C-” or better required for the major. Prerequisite: ECON 201.

ECON 302 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (5)

Short run fluctuations and long run fundamentals for macroeconomic variables such as GDP and its components, the unemployment rate, the price level and inflation rate, interest rates and the yield curve, exchange rates and the trade balance, the government debt-to-GDP ratio, potential output, and real growth.  Case studies, data collection and analysis, and monitoring of economic indicators and Federal Open Market Committee policies are integrated.  “C-” or better required for the major. Prerequisite: ECON 202.

ECON 310 Economics of Health and Health Care (5)

Demand and supply of health care services and methods of financing health care expenditures. Topics include health care production, asymmetric information, demographic trends, medical insurance industry, government insurance programs, medical risk and liability, health care reform, and comparative health care systems. Prerequisite: Areas A, B4, and D, one economics course or permission of instructor.  GE T3

ECON 311 The Pacific Rim Economies (5)

Economic developments in China, Japan, and the newly industrialized economies of East Asia. Trade in the Pacific Rim. Places economic development in its cultural/geographic context and critically examines economic institutions and policies. Prerequisite: Areas A, B4, and D. Recommended: one economics course or permission of instructor.  GE T3

ECON 320 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (5)

An introduction to the basic principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with applications to a variety of problems using established data sources. The course includes fundamental principles of cartographic design and communication. Students are expected to become proficient users of GIS Software package. Lab sessions cover step-by-step GIS practice in the real world, including working with private or public domain data, importing data into GIS, creating a GIS database, performing spatial analysis with tools, building GIS models, and presenting results. Prerequisite: ECON 210 or MIS 200A or equivalent. Cross listed with MIS 320

ECON 341 Globalization and Development (5)

This course uses a case study approach to the study of globalization and growth.  It uses an applied empirical approach to learning about macroeconomic management, economic development, international trade, and the cross border flows of goods and services and capital.  Economic activities such as trade, investments in equities and debt, tourism, development of intellectual property, and financial transactions, have become internationalized.  This is the current context in which businesses must operate.  Students learn how to conduct an assessment of international environments and political-economic strategies deployed in major world regions.  They perform a “country analysis”, which allows them to draw conclusions about market growth, labor costs, inflation and exchange rate stability, direct investment opportunities, etc.  Prerequisite:  ECON 202 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor.

ECON 343 Economics of Immigration Policy (5) 

The economic effects if various immigration policies, their impact on labor markets, as well as their relationship to national security are explored. The focus is on understanding and analyzing immigration policy, as well as their consequences on society and the economy.  This course will also consider immigration policy development. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 202 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor.

ECON 370 Environmental Economics (5)

Topics to include: static and dynamic efficiency and market failure; economic analysis of air, water, solid waste, and toxic policies; energy and the environment; benefit-cost policy analysis and case studies; tort and insurance issues; incentive-based regulations; monitoring and enforcement issues; risk assessment, management, and communication; global issues and agreements.  Prerequisite: Areas A, B4, and D; one economics course or permission of instructor.  GE T3

ECON 371  Economics of Agriculture and Natural Resources (5)

Economic policy analysis of agriculture and natural resources with emphasis on California agriculture. Topics include the structure and organization of U.S.’s agriculture and food system, specifically the operation, financing, linkages, and functions of its components; the economic aspects of a wide range of environmental issues including air and water pollution, optimal forest and fisheries management; recycling; cost-benefit policy analysis case studies; and international issues. Cross listed with AGBS 371. Prerequisite: ECON 201.

ECON 372 Agricultural Trade Policy (5)

An introduction to practical considerations of agricultural trade and trade policy analysis.  Emphasis is placed on concepts of agricultural trade, analysis of trade policies of major trading partners and the export/import marketing of agricultural products.  Also the interdependencies between the world’s food, populations and equitability/poverty problems and possible solutions are explored.  Cross listed with AGBS 372. Prerequisite:  ECON 201.

ECON 373 Agricultural Finance (5)

The objective of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary to evaluate and manage risk in the agricultural industry. This course provides an introduction to the economic theory, organization, and operating principles of agricultural commodity futures markets in the U.S.  Emphasis is placed on speculating, hedging, and investing in agricultural commodity futures contracts from the standpoint of the agribusiness entrepreneur. Capital theory is also visited.  Cross listed with AGBS 373. Prerequisites:  ECON 201, MATH 140; ECON 220 or equivalent; or permission of instructor.

ECON 377 Current Economic Issues (1-5)

Study of a current economic and social issue such as education, health care, taxation, social security, poverty and income distribution, public debt, international trade, or national security.  May be repeated for different course content.  Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 202 or permission of instructor.

ECON 380 Gender and Diversity in Workplace (5)

Development of topics in labor economics from the perspectives of gender studies and diversity.  Considerations of both national trends and international comparisons.  Topics include household production and time allocation, labor force participation, human capital accumulation, regional mobility, and occupational choices, wage differentials, discrimination, and poverty.  Prerequisite: any introductory course in social and behavioral sciences or permission of instructor.  GRE

ECON 381 Race, Gender and Prosperity in America (5)

Investigation of reasons for economic success and failures of minority members within our economy.  This course will start with the main economic tools necessary for policy analysis, move on to economic status, causes and cures, and finish with discrimination.  Social policies will be examined including but not restricted to equal employment opportunity and equality of income for Women, Hispanics, and African Americans.  Prerequisite:  any introductory course in social and behavioral sciences or permission of instructor.  GRE

ECON 388 Economics Book Club for Juniors (1)

This course nurtures lifelong learning by introducing students to the blogs and recent best sellers authored by leading economists for the general public. One book will be chosen to be read, analyzed and discussed. The course is taught in hybrid mode with a “book club” discussion toward the end of the course preceded during the quarter by several online assignments. Economics majors should enroll during their junior year. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

ECON 395 Economic Geography (5)

This course involves an examination of the spatial organization of economic activities.  Topics include population dynamics and migration, natural resources and location, transportation and communication networks, agriculture and rural land use, urban land use, city location and urban hierarchies, industrial location, world economic regions, and international trade and investment patterns.  Course also includes an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS).  Cross-listed with GEOG 395 under “Interdisciplinary Courses.”).

ECON 404 Law and Economics (5)

Law and economics involves a historical survey of the application of economic principles to the law and the contemporary use of economic principles to analyze the structure and effects of property, contract and tort law. Students engage in legal research using Lexis/Nexis in order to analyze the economic content of specific cases. The implications of the economic analysis of law for important policy issues are explained. Prerequisite:  ECON 201 or permission of instructor.

ECON 410 International Economic Development (5)

Analysis of major economic impediments to Third World development.  Topics include: the structural changes accompanying development, theories of development, impediments to development, role of the international sector, and government policy.  Prerequisite: Areas A, B4, and D; one economics course, or permission of instructor.  GE T3

ECON 420 Econometrics (5)

A study of the essentials of econometric theory with computer-based applications.  This course will enable students to construct empirical models, collect data, apply appropriate estimation techniques, and interpret the estimation results for decision making.  “C-” or better required for the major. Prerequisite:  MATH 140.

ECON 430 Money and Banking (5)

A study of the banking system, the demand and supply of money, monetary policy, the quantity theory of money, the interest rate, the theory of portfolio choice, and international finance.  Prerequisite: ECON 202

ECON 440 International Economics (5)

Theory and policy analysis pertaining to world payments systems, open economy macro-economics, international trade, multinational enterprises and direct foreign investment, and the international migration of labor. Prerequisite: one economics course or permission of instructor.

ECON 441 Financial Economics (5)

This course develops the main arguments in financial theory from an explicitly economic perspective. Financial economics involves the examination of the roles of time, uncertainty and information in economic transactions. This course analyzes financial institutions from a perspective of information theory.  We consider the theories of decision-making under uncertainty and asymmetric information.  Prerequisite:  ECON 201 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor.

ECON 451 Managerial Economics (5)

Application of empirical methods to managerial decisions.  Topics include estimation of demand, sales forecasts, business conditions analysis, estimation of production and cost functions, pricing and advertising, and capital budgeting.  Case studies and software applications.  Prerequisite: ECON 201, ECON 220 or equivalent; MATH 140; or permission of instructor.

ECON 453 Engineering Economics (5)

An overview of the economic methods used to evaluate projects and real assets.  Topics include financial math; investment criteria (present worth, annual equivalent worth, rate of return analysis); evaluating mutually exclusive alternatives; relative price movements and inflation; risk and uncertainty; cost minimization techniques such as equipment replacement analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis; after-tax analysis; project financing and capital constraints; and benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness methods. Prerequisite: Area B4 (MATH).

ECON 460 Financial Institutions Management (5)

An introduction to the operation, structure, and regulatory environment of the U.S. financial system.  Special attention given to the theories of interest rate determination, financial risk management, and asset/liability management in depository and non-depository institutions.  The course also investigates e-Business and changes in commercial banking, non-bank financial institutions and financial markets.  Computer models and cases are used to show real-world applications.  Cross-listed in Economics and Finance.  Prerequisite:  FIN 300 or ECON 302.

ECON 465 Industrial Organization (5)

Theoretical and empirical aspects of oligopoly theory.  Price and non-price competition.  The structure, conduct, and performance of selected American industries.  Considerations of both antitrust policy and managerial perspectives.  Prerequisite:  ECON 201 or permission of instructor.

ECON 470 Economics of the Public Sector (5)

Economic theories relating to market efficiency and failure, public expenditure, taxation, and political and bureaucratic behavior.  Examination of programs and policies in areas such as health care, technology, social insurance, welfare and income redistribution, child care and education, and transportation.  Examination of the tax system, fiscal federalism, and state and local government revenue and expenditure patterns.  Online information resources are used to locate and assess policy analyses and analyze expenditures and revenues for all levels of government.  Cross-listed in Economics and Public Policy & Administration.  Prerequisite:  ECON 201 or 202.

ECON 475. Energy Economics and Policy (5 units)

Role of energy in economic development; economic analysis of energy industries (fossil fuels, renewables, electricity and nuclear energy, and refineries and transportation). The geography and geopolitics of energy markets; policies relating to taxation and rate regulation, environmental quality and global warming, research and development, conservation, and national security. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or permission of instructor.

ECON 477 Selected Topics in Economics (1-5)

An in-depth study of an area of economics not included in current course offerings.  May be repeated for different course content.  Prerequisites as announced.

ECON 480 Human Resource Economics (5)

A study of labor force participation, labor demand, education and training, wage differentials, regional and occupational mobility, labor unions, and discrimination, poverty, and income distribution.  Prerequisite:  ECON 201 or permission of instructor.

ECON 488 Economics Book Club for Seniors (1)

This course nurtures lifelong learning by introducing students to the blogs and recent best sellers authored by leading economists for the general public. One book will be chosen to be read, analyzed and discussed. The course is taught in hybrid mode with a “book club” discussion toward the end of the course preceded during the quarter by several online assignments. Economics majors should enroll during their senior year. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only. 

ECON 490 Senior Project (4)

Student proposes and conducts an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member and presents the findings. Equivalent to ECON 490A and ECON 490B. “C-” or better required for the major. Prerequisite: ECON 301, 302, 420 and senior standing.

ECON 490A Senior Project I (1)

Student proposes an independent research project, completes a literature search, and prepares a bibliography. Prerequisite: ECON 301. Co-requisite or Prerequisite: ECON 302 and 420 and senior standing.

ECON 490B Senior Project II (3)

Student carries out an approved research project and presents the findings. “C-” or better required for the major. Prerequisite: ECON 301, 302, 420, and 490A and senior standing.

ECON 493. Regional Economics Workshop I (2 units)

A study of Kern County as an economic region, introducing regional economic concepts and methods of regional analysis. Regional economic databases will be updated and analyzed for economic trends (e.g., demographics, gross metro product, personal income, basic industries, labor markets, taxable sales, tax revenues and government expenditures). Both ECON 493 and 494 must be completed to receive credit for an elective in the major. Prerequisite: ECON 202.

ECON 494. Regional Economics Workshop II (3 units)

A continuation of ECON 493. Application of economic base, input-output, and linear regression models to analyzing Kern County’s economy. Both ECON 493 and 494 must be completed to receive credit for an elective in the major. Prerequisites: Econ 202 and 493.

ECON 495 Urban and Regional Economics (5)

A study of economic theories of urban and regional development.  Topics selected from:  economic base and industry composition analysis; location of economic activity; principles of urban economic development, housing, transportation, poverty and unemployment and municipal finance; Census and other socioeconomic data; analysis of economic forces which influence spatial patterns and the relationship between spatial patterns, public services, land use planning and land use control processes.  Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 395 or permission of instructor.

ECON 496 Internship in Economics (1-5)

Internships may be arranged by the department with various agencies, business, or industries.  The assignments and coordination of work projects with conferences and readings, as well as course credits, evaluation, and grading, and the responsibility of the faculty liaison (or course instructor) working with the field supervisor.  Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.  Department will determine credits and application of credit.

ECON 497 Cooperative Education (1-5)

The Cooperative Education program offers a sponsored learning experience in a work setting, integrated with a field analysis seminar. The field experience is contracted by the Cooperative Education office on an individual basis, subject to approval by the department. The field experience, including the seminar and reading assignments, is supervised by the cooperative education coordinator and the faculty liaison (or course instructor), working with the field supervisor. Students are expected to enroll in the course for at least two quarters. The determination of course credits, evaluation and grading are the responsibility of the departmental faculty. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.  Department will determine application of credit.

ECON 499 Individual Study (1-5)

Consent of department for the offering of independent studies.

Environmental Resource Management

ERM 300 Health and Safety Compliance (4)

Compliance requirements and practices for regulations governing the protection of people in and around the workplace.  Topics selected from personnel monitoring and protection, hazard assessment, hazardous materials management, hazard communication, emergency planning and response, risk management, multimedia compliance audits, and the training function within organizations. Includes conceptual models of hazard analysis as well as exercises and simulations.

ERM 301 Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health Management (4)

This course introduces the student to the history and evolution of the safety profession.  Students gain an intuitive understanding of the basic components of accident prevention and hazard control.  This course also provides and introduction to worker’s compensation, safety and health legislation, ergonomics, hazard analytical tools, communication techniques in safety and health management, emergency preparedness, industrial hygiene and measuring safety program success.

ERM 302 Advanced Occupational Safety and Health Management (4)

This course is a continuation of the introductory course (ERM 301). It further explores the topics discussed in ERM 301.  Students work in groups on case studies applying previously gained knowledge. The course explores in detail the OSHA regulations and expects students to be familiar with regulations pertinent to various industries.

ERM 310 Hazardous Materials Management (5)

Provides an in-depth examination of federal, state and local regulations and requirements for hazardous materials and wastes. Includes definitions of toxic and hazardous material; storage and treatment; transportation; emergency response planning; air and water quality; community concern issues; and risk assessment.

ERM 320 Industrial Hygiene Fundamentals (5)

Provides an introduction to the science of protecting the workers’ health through the evaluation of the work environment. Presents the basic principles and techniques for anticipating and recognizing chemical, biological, and physical hazards associated with the workplace environment.

ERM 413 Environmental Compliance (4)

Compliance requirements and practices for statutes and regulations governing the protection of air, water, and land resources.  Topics will include environmental impact assessment, emergency planning and response, and hazardous waste management. Case studies involving environmental compliance issues will be reviewed and evaluated.

ERM 477 Special Topics (1-5)

An in-depth study of an area of land resource management not included in current course offerings. May be repeated for different course content.  Prerequisites as announced.

ERM 489 Experiential Prior Learning (1-5)

Evaluation and assessment of learning that has occurred as a result of prior off-campus experience relevant to the curriculum of the department.  Requires complementary academic study and/or documentation.  Available by petition only, on a credit, no-credit basis.  Not open to postgraduate students.  Interested students should contact the department office. Maximum 5 units within the program. Cannot replace required courses within the major.

ERM 490A Senior Project I (1)

Student proposes and gains approval of an independent research project that will synthesize knowledge in science and technology, law, policy analysis, and other curriculum areas. Significant progress is made on an annotated bibliography and literature review. Prerequisites: Senior standing in the program.

ERM 490B Senior Project II (4)

Student completes activities for use by faculty in assessing learning outcomes for the major. In order to demonstrate integrative skills in this interdisciplinary major, the candidate completes a project that synthesizes knowledge in science and technology, law, policy analysis, and other curriculum areas. The strengths and limitations of each paradigm are recognized and integrated into demonstration of the thesis. Prerequisites: ERM 490A and Senior standing.

ERM 496 Internship in Environmental Resource Management (1-5)

Internships may be arranged with various businesses or agencies.  Supervision of the internship is shared by the field supervisor and course instructor.  The focus of the internship must be to develop and/or apply competencies pertinent to careers in environmental policy and compliance.  Offered on a credit, no-credit basis.  The instructor will determine units of credit and their application.

ERM 497 Cooperative Education (1-5)

The Cooperative Education program offers a sponsored learning experience in a work setting, integrated with a field analysis seminar.  The field experience is contracted by the Cooperative Education office on an individual basis, subject to approval by the department.  The field experience, including the seminar and reading assignments, is supervised by the cooperative education coordinator and the faculty liaison (or course instructor), working with the field supervisor.  Students are expected to enroll in the course for at least two quarters.  The determination of course credits, evaluation and grading are the responsibility of the department faculty. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.  Department will determine application of credit.

ERM 499 Individual Study (1-5)

Consent of department required.

Finance

FIN 100 Managing Your Personal Finances (5)

This course provides an examination of the financial situations students confront during their college years and thereafter.  The emphasis is on applying relatively simple concepts to managing one’s own financial resources.  Topics include:  budgeting, banking services, credit card use, consumer loans, insurance concepts, and savings plans.

FIN 300 Financial Management (5)

Financial management deals with the theory and practice of financing the business firm under uncertainty.  This course covers financial markets, risk valuation, financial analysis and forecasting, capital budgeting, working capital management, and capital structure.  This course also includes statistical and financial analysis of problem sets, as well as computer applications with an emphasis on spreadsheets.

FIN 322 Introduction to Personal Financial Planning (5)

This course introduces students to personal financial planning.  Topics in financial  planning include the financial planning process, client interaction, time value of money applications, personal financial statements, cash flow and debt management, asset acquisition, education planning, overview of investment planning and retirement planning, plan integration, ethics, and business aspects of financial planning. 

FIN 326 Investment Management (5)

This course involves the analysis of various types of securities, security markets, investment strategies, and methods of evaluating portfolio performance.  It also includes assessing the overall quality of portfolio management in the context of the financial plan.  Case analysis and student investment presentations are required.  Prerequisite:  FIN 300.

FIN 340 Principles of Insurance (5)

This course covers the principles of life, casualty, and liability insurance.  It also covers individual and group insurance programs, as well as methods of establishing risks and rates of return.  Prerequisite:  FIN 300.

FIN 360 Entrepreneurial and Small Business Finance (5)

This course covers financial issues, problems and situations frequently encountered in small businesses.  The course will address analytical techniques appropriate for small business situations including working capital management, financing alternatives, financial distress, and valuing the business.  In addition, it will address issues of financial strategy for small business.  Students will develop problem solving skills by analyzing weekly case study assignments.  Assignments will include empirical articles dealing with current topics in small business finance.  Prerequisite: FIN 300.

FIN 380 Introduction to Real Estate (5)

This course introduces students to real estate principles, practices, and investment decisions. It covers equity investment, finance, legal aspects, practices, principles, property development, real estate administration in the public sector, real estate market analysis, and valuation.  Prerequisite:  FIN 300.

FIN 400 Advanced Financial Management (5)

This course provides students with the opportunity both to recognize and to test the relevance of modern financial concepts in the context of real managerial decisions in the private sector, including ethical problems facing financial managers.  A case method utilizing statistical and financial analysis techniques and computer applications will be used to show real world applications.  Student presentations are required.  Prerequisite:  FIN 300.

FIN 460 Financial Institutions Management (5)

This course gives students a broad introduction to the operation, structure and regulatory environment of the U.S. financial system.  Special attention will be given to the theories of interest rate determination, financial risk management, and asset/liability management in depository and non-depository institutions.  The course also investigates e-Business and changes in commercial banking, non-bank financial institutions and financial markets.  Computer models and cases are used to show real world applications.  Student presentations are required.  Cross listed with ECON 460. Prerequisite:  FIN 300.

FIN 477 Special Topics in Finance (1-5)

Special topics course in Finance provides students with the opportunity to take an in-depth study of an area not covered in regular courses.  When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.  Prerequisite: FIN 300

FIN 490 International Business Finance (5)

This course investigates the problems facing financial managers in international operations.  Topics include:  foreign exchange, the international monetary system, managing exchange rate risk exposure, capital budgeting, international banking, and import/export financing.  Financial analysis using spreadsheets as well as student presentations may be required.  Prerequisite:  FIN 300.

FIN 496 Internship in Finance (1-5)

This course provides an integrated academic experience in a work setting.  Units may not be used to satisfy the requirements of the Business Administration major.  Students may earn a maximum of 5 units through internships.  It is offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.  Prerequisite:  FIN 300 and one additional upper division Finance course or permission of the Department Chair.

Management

MGMT 300 Organizational Behavior (5)

Students are provided with theoretical and conceptual frameworks drawn from the social sciences for understanding human behavior in business organizations.  Emphasis is placed on the application of these theories and concepts to management and behavioral issues in organizations.  Topics include individual differences, perception, motivation, learning, groups, communication, leadership, decision-making, diversity, total quality management, international OB, politics, and ethics.

MGMT 302 Introduction to Operations Management (5)

An introduction to the system for planning, operating, and controlling the processes that transform inputs into outputs of finished goods and services in both profit and nonprofit organizations.  Topics include:  operations strategy, operations technology, product and service design, project planning and scheduling, facility location planning, facility layout, materials management, Six Sigma, and quality management and control.  Computer software is used to analyze operations management functions.  Recommended:  BA 301.

MGMT 308 Organization Theory and Design (5)

A study of the theories and research that explain why business organizations operate the way they do.  A social system perspective is presented that views the business organization’s external environment and structure as critical determinants of organizational effectiveness.  Key department level and organizational level variables and models are studied with the goal of developing an understanding of the patterns and relationships among organizational dimensions such as strategy, structure, goals, size, technology, and external environment.  Prerequisite:  MGMT 300.

MGMT 309 Career and Managerial Skills (5)

This course has three primary objectives:  increase understanding of relevant career options through completion of the comprehensive career assessment plan, increase understanding of managerial and employee survival skills and increase understanding of work/life balance issues through completion of a comprehensive work/life balance assessment balance. Prerequisite:  MGMT 300.

MGMT 310 Human Resource Management (5)

This course provides an overview of the functional areas of Human Resource Management.  The course begins by examining environmental factors such as legislation, organizational strategy, labor, and global issues.  Next the HR process is examined-recruiting, training, compensation, benefits, performance appraisal, and termination.  Throughout the course, students are provided with the opportunity to engage in HR practice and develop HR policy.  Prerequisite:  MGMT 300.

MGMT 340 Entrepreneurship (5)

This course fosters the acquisition of knowledge and skills needed to start a new venture.  The student is required to assess his or her own entrepreneurial orientation and to formulate a realistic business plan for a new venture.  Topic areas include self-assessment, identifying and evaluating new venture opportunities, obtaining capital, writing and presenting the business plan, and managing the emerging firm.

MGMT 345 Small Business Management (5)

This course is designed to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge and skills needed to manage an ongoing small business.  The focus is on owner/manager decision-making.  Topics covered include ownership, personal selling, advertising, sales promotion, financial analysis, record keeping, personnel management, and the like.

MGMT 350 Agricultural Management (5)

Core management concepts and theories applied to agribusiness. Topics include individual dynamics (motivation, values); planning (demand, forecasts, budgets); organizing (strategy, structure, change); leadership (power, influence, negotiation, human resources); and control (product/inventory, financial management). Cross listed with AGBS 350.

MGMT 405 International Management (5)

An examination of contemporary issues related to managerial training, political structure, foreign receptivity to United States business, cultural factors, organizing, and controlling the international firm.

MGMT 420 Compensation and Benefits Administration (5)

This course is designed to provide the student with a practical and theoretical understanding of compensation and benefits from the perspectives of managers (who make reward decisions), employees (who receive the rewards and are the “customers” of the reward system), and human resource practitioners (who assist in the design and maintenance of reward systems).  Topics include pay strategies, job evaluation, salary surveys, pay structures, pay banding, merit pay, skill-based pay, team-based pay, gainsharing, profit sharing, legally required benefits, health insurance, and retirement plans.  Prerequisite: MGMT 310.

MGMT 422 Staffing, Selection, and Workforce Development (5)

This course is designed to provide the student with a practical and theoretical understanding of workforce planning, specifically the staffing and selection process and workforce development.  Topics include current legal issues, interviewing methods, assessment centers, integrity testing, personality testing, psychological tests, validation methods, planning, and cost evaluation, as well as workforce training and development needs.  Prerequisite: MGMT 310.

MGMT 428 Current Topics in Human Resource Management (5)

This course is about leading edge topics in Human Resource Management.  As the organization’s requirements change, so must the skill set of the HR professional supporting that organization. Topics may include top management roles, change management methodologies, strategic HR planning, international HRM, benchmarking HR processes, reengineering human resources, the role of training, and consultant roles. This course will rely on case studies and research to develop these skills. Prerequisite: MGMT 310.

MGMT 430 Negotiation, ADR, and Conflict Management (5)

Comprehensive survey of current trends in the theory and practice of negotiation as a means of transacting business, including the resolution of conflict and reaching agreement. Principles of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) will be introduced as a tool for resolving disputes by non-litigious approaches, such as third party intervention, mediation, arbitration, etc. Topics include: integrative and distributive methods; internal team management and pre-negotiation analysis; tactics and strategies; context and dynamics; diversity impact of culture, gender, and personality types; implementation, monitoring, and follow-up; and multilateral negotiation. Recommended:  MGMT 300.

MGMT 440 Logistics Management (5)

This is an introductory survey course of the history, current issues, and basic principles of logistics.  It will examine the basic activities of logistics operations, the role of information technology, benefits of strategic partnerships, procurement, customer service, warehousing, transportation, and regulation.  All will be discussed within the context of globalization.  Course prerequisites: MGMT 302 and MKTG 300.

MGMT 445 Purchasing and Supply Chain Management

This is a survey course of the current issues and basic principles of purchasing and its role in the era of global supply chains.  It will examine the traditional role of purchasing and supply management in cost containment and revenue enhancement.  As well, the more recent responsibilities of environmental, social, political, and security concerns that have arisen with the expansion of supply chains into developing countries will also be examined.  Course prerequisites: MGMT 302 and MKTG 300, and Lower Division Core.

MGMT 460 Total Quality Management (5)

This course uses an applied and theory based approach to introduce the core principles of TQM, the most common and current TQM practices/techniques and how they relate to familiar management concepts.  The course covers the concepts of customer-supplier relations, teamwork, and empowerment, and how TQM relates to topics such as organizational design and change, groups, leadership, and motivation.  Students will learn how these principles and methods have been put into effect in a variety of organizations.  Topics include:  a review of contributions by Deming, Juran, Crosby and other, statistical aids, process control, quality teamwork, designing organizations for quality, strategic planning and total quality implementation, and quality leadership.

MGMT 477 Special Topics in Management (1-5)

This course provides an opportunity to present an in-depth study of selected management subjects not covered in regular courses.  When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.

MGMT 496 Internship in Management (1-5)

This course is designed to provide an integrated academic experience in a work setting.  Units may not be used to satisfy the requirements of the Business Administration major.  Students may earn a maximum of 5 units through internships. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

Management Information Systems

MIS 200A Software Productivity Tools (2)

This course examines software productivity tools.  These tools will include word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation software and the Internet.  Microsoft Windows will be taught in order to manage microcomputer resources.  In addition, students will be shown how to use and benefit from the information superhighway.  A comprehensive test, designed by the BPA faculty, will be given at the end of the course.

MIS 300 Management Information Systems:  Concepts and Applications (5)

This course will provide an overview of the computer-based information systems, their components, and the process of development and implementation.  The role of information systems will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective.  A heavy emphasis will be given to information management, database design, collection and manipulation of data, sharing data among the functional areas and relational database concepts.  New developments in MIS and how they affect the functional areas of business that improve the competitiveness of a business organization will be explored and developed.  Issues such as decision support systems, geographic information systems and group support systems will be explored. Prerequisite: MIS 200A or equivalent.

MIS 320 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (5)

An introduction to the basic principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with applications to a variety of problems using established data sources. The course includes fundamental principles of cartographic design and communication. Students are expected to become proficient users of ArcView GIS Software package. Lab sessions cover step-by-step GIS practice in the real world, including working with public domain data, importing data into GIS, creating a GIS database, performing spatial analysis with tools, building GIS models, and presenting results. Business and public sector applications. Prerequisite: MIS 200A, ECON 210, or equivalent.  Cross-listed with ECON 320.

MIS 330 System Analysis and Design (5)

The analysis and design of computer-based information systems.  The systems development life cycle will be emphasized.  Tools such as data flow diagrams, layout charts, decision tables and computer-aided software engineering will be utilized.  Students will analyze a real-life business problem and design a computer based solution.  Prerequisite:  MIS 300 or equivalent.

MIS 340 Fundamentals of Database Systems and Internet Technologies (5)

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and applications of relational database systems, as well as basic knowledge of Geo-database systems. Students will gain an understanding of the relational model and SQL, as well as the entity-relationship diagram for database modeling. The concepts and tools of database design will be stressed. Students will be required to use various tools (i.e., CASE) for instruction and assignments. Prerequisite: MIS 200A, ECON 210, or equivalent.

MIS 440 Data Communications (5)

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and applications of relational database systems, as well as basic knowledge of Geo-database systems. Students will gain an understanding of the relational model and SQL, as well as the entity-relationship diagram for database modeling. The concepts and tools of database design will be stressed. Students will be required to use various tools (i.e., CASE) for instruction and assignments. Prerequisite: MIS 200A, ECON 210, or equivalent.

MIS 477 Special Topics in Management Information Systems (1-5)

This course provides an opportunity to present an in-depth study of selected management information systems subjects not covered in regular courses.  When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.

MIS 480 Electronic Commerce (5)

This course examines the foundations, applications, and business models of e-commerce as they relate to functional area of a business. Nine major categories of e-commerce will be explored and their popular business models will be discussed. Web marketing, electronic payment systems and mobile commerce will be examined. The course will also review various scenarios for the future of e-commerce including the convergence of e-commerce and traditional commerce. Prerequisite: MIS 300 or MKTG 300 or equivalent.

MIS 496 Internship in Management Information Systems (1-5)

This course is designed to provide an integrated academic experience in a work setting.  Units may not be used to satisfy the requirements of the Business Administration major.  Students may earn a maximum of 5 units through internships.  Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only. Prerequisite:  MIS 260 or equivalent and MIS 300 or equivalent or permission of the instructor

Marketing

MKTG 300 Marketing Principles (5)

A study of the nature and role of marketing in advanced economies in a managerial context presented in a lecture, case, and applied format.  Analysis of consumer wants, motivation and purchasing power, and introduction to and development of effective mixes among product, pricing, distribution, and promotional variables.  Internet and e-commerce issues are also discussed.

MKTG 301 Consumer Behavior (5)

An analysis of the individual and aggregate market behavior of consumers and of the use of theoretical and empirical consumer information in developing marketing policy and strategy.  Prerequisite:  MKTG 300.

MKTG 302 Advertising and Public Relations Strategy (5)

An integrated approach to planning and creating the firm’s total marketing communications program, primarily advertising, sales promotion, public relations, and Internet advertising.  Surveys the entire field of promotion in its social and management context and develops the creative approach, strategy, and tactics necessary to realize the objectives of the marketing program.  Emphasizes student participation through cases and projects; also the application of quantitative statistical and qualitative research techniques to formulate and evaluate communications plans.  Prerequisite:  MKTG 300.

MKTG 304 Professional Selling (5)

Study of professional selling process as marketing activity.  Topics include understanding buyer/consumer behavior, communication, relationship building.  Students will be trained in tools for effective professional selling or other persuasive business interactions.  Skills include finding leads, qualifying prospects, determining needs, developing and delivering sales presentations, overcoming objections, closing sales, and post-sales support.  Role-playing is an integral part of the course.  Prerequisite:  MKTG 300.

MKTG 315 Professional Self-Presentation (2)

Graduating students, both business majors and non-business majors, need to be able to present themselves well in order to succeed, regardless of their career path. Reports from recruiters indicate that students often come ill prepared to job interviews. This course will help students learn to more effectively promote themselves by making good first impressions and by using proper etiquette, good conversational skills, proper grammar, and effective body language.

MKTG 351 Agricultural Marketing (5)

Core marketing concepts applied to agriculture and the food system.  Considers the conceptual foundations of effective marketing and industry practices by growers, processors and packagers, distributors, brokers, agents, and retailers. Imparts a forward-looking global perspective by incorporating research findings, technology trends, and international marketing strategies.  Incorporates business cases, simulated decision scenarios, guest speakers, and field projects involving local enterprises. Ethical issues are considered and marketing strategies analyzed in the context of customer objectives and stakeholder concerns. Cross listed as AGBS 351.

MKTG 400 Marketing Research and Control (5)

A study of the concepts underlying the collection and analysis of data for marketing decision-making and control.  Surveys the application of scientific methodology as an aid to problem formulation, exploratory research, basic observational and sampling requirements, data analysis, interpretation, reporting, and control.  Student application of research techniques and data treatment is emphasized.  Prerequisites:  MKTG 300 and BA 301.

MKTG 405 Sales Management (5)

Recruitment, hiring, training and retention of salespersons.  Providing analytical skills related to sales planning, analysis and control, sales forecasting, and estimating the profitability of the sales generated and potential sales.  Prerequisites:  MKTG 300.

MKTG 406 Marketing Channels and Logistics (5)

A study of the distribution function including retail management, supply chain management, inventory management, transportation, and e-marketing distribution strategies.  Includes study of relationship building with channel partners, channel leadership and integrated channel strategies.

MKTG 410 e-Business Marketing Strategy Analyses (5)

Customer service and positive customer experience are critical in the E-Business marketplace.  This course covers all the necessary technical details related to the Internet, and places these details within the context of marketing strategy, consumer behavior, advertising, and other marketing topics.  Specific topics discussed include detail assessment of:  the relationship between brand management and marketing strategy; the rise of web casting; web site promotion; web site quality measurements; email list harvesting and targeting; banner ad exchange; search engine positioning; web survey methodology; web site traffic analysis; Usenet; and news group marketing.

MKTG 420 Global Marketing (5)

Analysis of the development of international marketing strategies and programs from the determination of objectives and methods of organization through execution of research, advertising, pricing, distribution, financing, and human resource management activities.  Emphasis on the design of optimal strategies under varying physical, economic, political, social and cultural environments and specific marketing situations.  Case analysis.  Prerequisite:  MKTG 300.

MKTG 430 Services Marketing (5)

An intensive study of the concepts, practices, and development of strategies involved in marketing of services.  The course will focus on the unique aspects of services marketing, such as demand management and quality control, and will cover a wide variety of services, including professional and business services.  A case analysis approach will be used.  Prerequisite:MKTG 300.

MKTG 477 Special Topics in Marketing (1-5)

This course provides an opportunity to present an in-depth study of selected marketing subjects not covered in regular courses.  When offered, prerequisites and course requirements will be announced for each course.

MKTG 490 Marketing Planning and Problem Solving (5)

Focuses upon formal marketing planning and analysis of problems facing the marketing executive.  Practical case studies utilized for the identification and analysis of marketing problems, selection and evaluation of alternative solutions and plans, and implementation of recommended strategies.  The course integrates all aspects of marketing, business and quantitative theory into strategic policy-making, including Internet marketing and e-commerce.  Prerequisites:  MKTG 300 and two additional marketing courses, or permission of the instructor.

MKTG 496 Internship in Marketing (1-5)

This course is designed to provide an integrated academic experience in a work setting.  Units may not be used to satisfy the requirements of the Business Administration major.  Students may earn a maximum of 5 units through internships.  Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

Public Policy Administration

PPA 275 American Government and Public Administration (5)

This course analyzes the field of public administration. Topics analyzed include the role of government in American society, the historic development of the public service, management issues related to modern governmental enterprises, problems of personnel, public budgeting, and alternative strategies for securing administrative responsibility. The course focuses on readings and cases pertaining to local and state administration, although issues involving the federal level are discussed where appropriate. GE D3, USCA/USCN

PPA 300 Public Management and Leadership (5)

Introduces basic principles of responsible leadership, effective management, organizational change in public, nonprofit and health care management settings. Includes social science issues in: authority, motivation, organization behavior and leadership styles. GE T3

PPA 320 Information and Data Management in Public Administration (5)

This course explores how information technology and data management techniques are being used in public organizations to manage organizational processes, plan community action and evaluate service. The problems and promise of IT are examined and the student learns basic skills in information and data management. Case studies and IT professionals are used to enhance learning.

PPA 325 Introduction to Administrative Law and Bureaucracy (5)

This course introduces the student to the concepts and processes of administrative law and governmental regulation. It reviews the evolution of administrative authority, rule-making, enforcement, adjudication, and judicial review.

PPA 340 Policy Networks (5)

This course offers an overview of the policy-making process and policy networks at the national, state, and local levels. This process can be divided (somewhat arbitrarily) into several stages: agenda setting, policy formulations, policy adoption, budgeting, policy implementation, and policy evaluation. The course covers the relevant literature on each stage of the process. The course will also examine several important policy areas including economic policy, energy and environmental policy, crime and criminal justice, welfare policy, health policy, education policy, legal and social equality, immigration policy, and life-style policy. GE T3

PPA 350 Nonprofit Organizations in America (5)

The nonprofit sector is an important feature in American society, a force in our economy and a distinctive feature in the American democracy. This course introduces the student to the nature, scope, values and unique features of nonprofit and social service organizations. The concepts of philanthropy, charity, and welfare are explored and the student establishes a relationship with a local nonprofit.

PPA 401 Analytical Methods in Administration (5)

This seminar provides an introduction to applied research and basic statistical techniques for decision- making in public administration and the management of health care and nonprofit agencies. The course covers experimental, quasi-experimental and nonexperimental research designs; measurement; data gathering techniques and sources, including survey research; and the evaluation and communication of research findings. Serves as undergraduate PPA statistics requirement and MPA and MSA-HCM foundation course. Students should have familiarity with interval level statistics.

PPA 419 Aging Services Administration (5)

This course focuses on current administration processes and the organization of services to the aging. It also surveys related policies at the national, state and local levels. There is special emphasis on services present in Kern County.

PPA 425 The U.S. Health Care System: Then and Now (5)

This course explores the development of the US health care system---social, cultural, economic, and political---to identify the values of this unique system of financing and delivering health care services. Comparisons are made between the past and present, the systems of other nations with that of the US, medical and social theories of different systems, and importantly the present and future of US health care. Students interested in careers in health and health care are encouraged to develop a frame of reference about health care that is provided through this introductory course. The course is delivered as either a hybrid or completely online course.

PPA 426 Marketing in Health and Human Services (5)

This course focuses on aligning health and human services offerings with the demands of markets, in order to maximize customer / client value and organizational competitive advantage.  Course components include:  the nature of marketing function; differences in services and product markets and marketing; market analysis; fundamentals of individual and organizational buying behavior; elements of the tactical marketing mix; and marketing strategies.

PPA 430 Parks, Public Lands, and the Environment (5)

This seminar provides a survey of major parks, forest, public land issues, and institutions at the local, state, and national levels. Key topics include law enforcement and order maintenance, regulatory enforcement, safety and security concerns, visitors and ranger diversity, and ecological/environmental policies for parks, forests, and other public lands and recreational areas.

PPA 450 Contract Management (5)

This course examines principles, practices, and issues of contract management activities within government, nonprofit, and commercial/business organizations. A comprehensive evaluation of the process addresses the fundamentals of managing the entire contract life cycle of small to large transactions in a management systems approach. Participants develop practical competencies in using different planning, development, implementation, monitoring, and close-out templates and guidelines, as well as techniques relating to critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making. Federal Acquisition Regulations’ principles are integrated into the transaction process to address an extended range of contracting complexities associated with expanded expectations, such as delivery of advanced technology systems or logistical issues involving intricate delivery schedules.

PPA 465 The Art and Science of Supervision (5)

The purpose of this course is to develop or enhance skills for effective supervision at all levels in a variety of settings. Two primary areas of supervision will be addressed: work environments (organizational structures, culture, climates, norms and values) and leadership skills (motivation, communication and human relations). Supplemental areas of study will include the processes of change, issues in training and development, ethics in the decision making process, and forms of supervision including coaching and mentoring. The course will also explore the theoretical, philosophical, and historical foundations of supervision.

PPA 470 Economics of the Public Sector (5)

Economic theories relating to market efficiency and failure, public expenditure, taxation, and political and bureaucratic behavior. Examination of programs and policies in areas such as health care, technology, social insurance, welfare and income redistribution, child care and education, and transportation. Examination of the tax system, fiscal federalism, and state and local government revenue and expenditure patterns. Online information resources are used to locate and assess policy analyses and analyze expenditures and revenues for all levels of government. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 202. Cross-listed with ECON 470.

PPA 471 Administration in the Justice System (5)

This course provides an intensive analysis of the major components of the criminal justice system as well as the interrelationships between the system’s primary components. Management personnel, decision-making, and planning problems faced by administrators within the justice system will be explored through guest presentations, discussion, individual and group presentations.

PPA 473 Public Administration and the Political Process (5)

This course utilizes readings and discussion on the functions of public administration in a democratic political system. Case studies, guest presentations, individual and group presentations explore the media, pressure group processes, and the relationships between administration and political processes in defining the public interest and responding to social conditions.

PPA 475 Introduction to Emergency Management (5)

This course will examine the issues surrounding emergency management since September 11, 2001.  We will pay particular attention to the four phases of emergency management (mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery), the organization of emergency management, and the politics of emergency management.

PPA 476 Public Human Resource Administration (5)

This course explores several of the major issues and ideas of public personnel administration: selection, promotion, pay, and discipline of public administrators; the merit system; civil service boards; collective bargaining in the public sector; and ethical problems of modern public administrators. Includes discussion of nonprofit agency personnel administration.

PPA 477 Selected Topics in Public Policy and Administration (1-5)

In-depth studies of selected topic or topics not covered in regular courses are offered on a student demand basis. Topics vary each quarter; prerequisites announced for each topic. Conducted on seminar basis.

PPA 478 Budgeting in Public Organizations (5)

This course will introduce the student to the major concepts of public budgeting and finance in the United States. Budgeting at all levels of government will be covered. Key topics of study include: expenditure estimation, revenue forecasting, capital budgeting, budget reform and financial management. The role of the budget in the policy process will also be emphasized.

PPA 479 Urban Planning and Public Policy (2.5-5)

This course introduces the student to the philosophy, theory, and practice of urban planning. In particular, the course material examines the development of cities and urban regions and the structure and functions of contemporary cities. Students will conduct a critical review of alternative theories, recent trends, and new directions in American planning concepts and institutions. In addition, the course will feature an analysis of the context, function, and legal aspects of land use controls, construction codes, mass transit, urban renewal, model cities, new towns, and related aspects of policy and programs implementation. The course may be offered for either 2.5 credits in five weeks or 5 credits in 10 weeks. The 10-week course will provide a more in-depth coverage of the topic. Matched with PPA 524 State, Local, and Intergovernmental Management if taught for 2.5 credits in five weeks.

PPA 489 Prior Experiential Learning (1-20)

This course is designed to provide a mechanism by which new or continuing students may receive academic credit for prior experiential learning through a portfolio review process. Students may earn up to 20 credits through this mechanism. To be eligible for academic credit, a student’s prior experiential learning must meet the following criteria: (1) the learning must have subject matter knowledge or base; (2) the learning must have general applicability outside the specific situation in which it was acquired; (3) the learning must be equivalent to college level work in terms of quality; (4) the students must be able to demonstrate that they know the relationship between what they have learned and other related subject fields and their own goals; and (5) the learning must be verifiable; i.e., the students must be able to demonstrate that they possess the learning which they have claimed. The Undergraduate Program Advisor in the Department of Public Policy and Administration will make decisions regarding the awarding of credit. Prerequisites: General Studies Portfolio Development course or PPA 499 focused on portfolio development.

PPA 490 Senior Seminar in Public Administration (5)

This capstone seminar for students in public administration examines: (1) the structure and environment of modern public bureaucracy; (2) the key administrative processes such as decision making leadership, communications, budgeting, and personnel; (3) the policymaking process; (4) political and economic bases of public policy and administration. Prerequisites: PPA 275, 300, 476 (OR MGMT 310), and PPA 478. PPA 490 is normally taken in the last quarter before graduation.

PPA 491 (formerly PPA 500) Survey of Public Administration (5)

This graduate seminar introduces and examines a variety of environmental forces, including social/sociological, micro/macro economics, political, constitutional/ legal, that shape public administration. It discusses and analyzes the essential theories, principles, structures and trends in those areas that affect American public policy and administration, and provides a foundation for further graduate study of public administration, and provides a foundation for further graduate study of public administration. May be taken as a senior elective with department approval.

PPA 492 (formerly PPA 502) Program Evaluation (5)

(Application of skills acquired in PPA 401) This course deals with the application of research methods to the evaluation of social service programs, particularly in health and human service agencies. This form of research provides knowledge of and about services, identifies the intended and unintended consequences of service interventions, and contributes information for policy decisions. Furthermore, program evaluation is an action based form of research and, therefore, this course is designed as an action based learning experience. Prerequisite: PPA 401.

PPA 493 (formerly PPA 503) The Public Policy-Making Process (5)

This course examines the public policy-making process at the federal, state, and local levels. Students will explore problem definition, agenda setting, policy formulation, policy legitimation, policy implementation, and policy evaluation. Students will explore the development of public policy by tracing individual social, economic, and health care policies through the stages of the process. GWAR

PPA 494 (formerly PPA 504) Contemporary Issues in Health Care Management (5)

Using case studies and class presentations, this graduate seminar introduces and examines the internal and external political, social, economic and legal forces that affect the organization of health service. It explores health care policy innovations, the application of management theory to current health services problems, and the future of health services. May be taken as a senior elective with department approval.

PPA 496 Internship in Public Administration (5)

Students are assigned to various agencies and work under joint supervision of supervisors and the course instructor. Participation in staff and internship conferences, assigned reading, project where appropriate. (Arrangements should be made one quarter in advance, as enrollments are limited.) Prerequisites: permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Department determines application and number of units. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

PPA 497 Cooperative Education (1-5)

The Cooperative Education Program provides a sponsored learning experience in a work setting, integrated with a field analysis seminar. The field experience, including the seminar and reading assignments, is supervised by the cooperative education coordinator and faculty liaison working with the field supervisor. May be repeated. May not be used as a substitute for requirements. Department to determine application and number of units. Offered on a credit, no-credit basis only.

PPA 499 Individual Study (1-5)

Individual supervised projects or directed reading projects for students qualified to carry on independent work. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair. Up to 5 units may be used to satisfy elective degree requirements. Department determines application and number of units. Note: To count for graduate elective credit and maintain graduate course standards, 400-level courses must be augmented with additional work.