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Lower Division


ENGL 80 Reading and Writing (5)

 Designed to improve reasoning, reading, and writing skills.

Helps students build a strong foundation in these skills for

successful performance in college. This course may be taken

for credit toward full-time status but does not count toward

the baccalaureate degree. Prerequisite: Total English

Placement Test score between 120-137.

ENGL 90/97 English as a Second Language (5)

 Prepares non-native English speaking undergraduate (ENGL

90) and graduate students (ENGL 97) for university level

coursework. ENGL 90/97 concentrates on the development

of English literacy skills. Students combine sentences,

summarize and critique academic texts, write several short

papers, and gain experience with academic research while

writing a short research paper. They also develop skills in

editing the grammar and mechanics of written English.

Required of international students whose English Placement

Test score is T141 or below.

Note:  ENGL 90/97 is offered through the Intensive English

Language Center (IELC) in Extended University. Students

must register directly with IELC at (661) 654-2014.

ENGL 99 Critical Thinking and Writing (5)

 Study of rhetorical patterns as critical thinking strategies to

help students develop effective college-level writing skills.

Frequent short papers in a variety of essay modes are assigned,

and the fundamentals of grammar, usage, punctuation, and

spelling are reviewed as necessary. Prerequisite: Total English

Placement Test score between 138-146 OR a grade of C- or

higher in English 80 or 90.

ENGL 101 Introduction to Literature: Texts and Contexts

(5)

 Introduction to major literary works as they embody traditional

forms and literary devices and as they express enduring themes

in social, historical, or aesthetic contexts. Includes the study

of one or more of the four basic genres (poetry, fiction, drama,

and nonfiction prose). Focus of the course will be indicated

in the class notes section of the class search (e.g. Intro. to

Lit.: Fiction and Non-Fiction, or Intro. to Lit.: Poetry.) Focus

placed on literary terminology and the development of

analytical research skills. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the

equivalent. GE C4

ENGL 110 Writing and Research (5)

 Practice in expository writing, including the college term

paper. Includes frequent reading and writing assignments.

Prerequisite: ENGL 99 with a grade of “C” or better or

equivalent; a total English Placement Test score of 147 or

higher; a score of 500 or above on the critical reading section

of the College Board SAT Reasoning Test; a score of 22 or

above on the American College Testing (ACT) English Test;

a score of “Exempt” or “Ready for college-level English

courses” on the CSU Early Assessment Program (EAP) taken

along with the English Language Arts California Standard Test

in grade 11; a passing score on the Bakersfield College English

Placement Test. GE A2

Note:  The following earns credit and exempts students from

ENGL 110 and 101: a score of 3 or above on either the

Language and Composition or Composition and Literature

examination of the College Board Scholastic Advanced

Placement Program; a score of 4 or better on the International

Baccalaureate (IB); completion and transfer to CSU of the

credits for a college course that satisfies the CSU General

Education requirement in English Composition, provided such

a course was completed with a grade of “C” or better. A score

of 4 or better on the International Baccalaureate (IB) gives

students credit for ENGL 110.

ENGL 200 The English Major and Career Opportunities

(1)

 Introduction to requirements and basic methods in the major,

and an exploration of career opportunities for English majors

in a variety of professions, including teaching English as a

second language, college teaching, gaming writer, content

provider, editor, publisher, public relations, journalism,

research, law, library and information science, etc. May include

preparation of resumes and cover letters and career research.

Required for majors in English Language and Literature.

Offered as a hybrid or online course on a credit /no credit

basis only.

ENGL 201 The English Major with Credential Emphasis

(1)

 Introduction to the English Major with Credential Emphasis

(EMCE), including examination of Standards and curricular

requirements for secondary school English teachers. Required

for credential majors. Offered on a credit/no-credit basis only.

ENGL 204 American Literature Survey I (5)

 Survey of selected works of American literature from

colonization to the Civil War, with particular emphasis on

major figures and movements from the early and late colonial,

early national, and romantic periods, including such

subcategories as the literature of exploration, the Puritans,

the American Enlightenment, and the American Renaissance.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the equivalent. GE C4

ENGL 205 American Literature Survey II (5)

 Survey of selected works of American literature from the Civil

War to the present, tracing the development of American

poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama, with particular

emphasis on major figures and movements such as realism,

naturalism, the literature of the Gilded Age, modernism, and

postmodernism, including such sub-categories as regionalism,

the literature of rural and urban landscape, transcontinental

modernism, and the modern and postmodern avant-garde.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the equivalent. GE C4

ENGL 207 Ethnic-Minority American Literature (5)

 Introduction to a body of literature that is not often included

in the traditional American literature curriculum. Major works

of African-American, Asian-American, Native American, and

Chicano literatures. Some study of the social and cultural

contexts out of which this literature emerges will be included.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the equivalent. This is a writing

intensive class. GE C4

ENGL 208 British Literature Survey I (5)

 Survey of major works and major writers from the Anglo-

Saxon period to the Restoration. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or

the equivalent. GE C4

ENGL 209 British Literature Survey II (5)

 Survey of major works and major writers from the Restoration

through the modern and contemporary era. Prerequisite: ENGL

110 or the equivalent. GE C4

ENGL 235 Shakespeare’s World (5)

 Introduction to the world in which Shakespeare lived and

wrote. Using an interdisciplinary approach which brings

together English literature, theatre, and media (video

recordings of the plays), the class is designed to examine

Renaissance England’s historical, social, artistic, literary,

theatrical, moral, and ethical milieu through a detailed study/

viewing of three selected plays. This is a writing intensive

class. GE C4

ENGL 272 Introduction to Creative Writing (5)

 Introduction to the theory and practice of creative writing,

including poetry, fiction, and non-fiction prose. Prerequisite:

ENGL 110 or the equivalent. GE C4

ENGL 289 Experiential Prior Learning (variable units)

 Evaluation and assessment of learning which has occurred as

a result of prior off-campus experience relevant to the

curriculum of the department. Requires complementary

academic study and/or documentation. Available by petition

only, on a credit/no credit basis. Not open to postgraduate

students. Interested students should contact the department

office.

ENGL 290 Introduction to World Literature (5)

 An introduction to the study of world literature in English

translation. Texts represent a variety of authors and eras,

cultural contexts, and the major genres (poetry, fiction, drama).

Fundamental emphasis will be placed on method-the

techniques of comparative analysis and interpretation.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the equivalent. GE C4

ENGL 294 Masterpieces of Early Western World

Literature: The Greeks to the Renaissance (5)

 Representative masterworks from key periods of Western

culture from the Greeks to the Renaissance (including all the

major genres-poetry, fiction, drama) studied from the vantage

point of both their historical significance and their enduring

aesthetic significance. Discussion and application of critical

techniques to enlarge the student’s understanding and

appreciation of literature and to increase skill in interpretation.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the equivalent. This is a writing

intensive class. GE C4

ENGL 295 Masterpieces of Late Western World

Literature: The Enlightenment to the Present (5)

 Representative masterworks from key periods of Western

culture since the Enlightenment (including all the major

genres-poetry, fiction, drama) studied from the vantage point

of both their historical significance and their enduring aesthetic

significance. Discussion and application of critical techniques

to enlarge the student’s understanding and appreciation of

literature and to increase skill in interpretation. Prerequisite:

ENGL 110 or the equivalent. This is a writing intensive class.

GE C4

ENGL 299 Individual Study (variable units)


UPPER DIVISION


ENGL 300 Critical Approaches to Literature (5)

Introduction to various critical approaches and aesthetic

theories used in the study of literature. This survey may

include, but is not limited to, a history of literary aesthetics

from the classical to modern periods, and/or contemporary

theoretical paradigms that are influential in literary studies

today. Twentieth and twenty-first century approaches may

include historicist (old and new), traditional humanist,

formalist, deconstructionist, psychoanalytic, feminist, Marxist,

postcolonial, among others.  Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 235, 272,

290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 301 Teaching High School English Language Arts

(5)

 Provides pre-service teachers with background knowledge,

theoretical foundations, and pedagogical skills essential to

develop a principled framework of practice that reflects a deep

understanding about teaching and learning in the High School

English Language Arts classroom. This course is required for

all students in the English single-subject program, the English

Major with Credential Emphasis (EMCE). The course is open

only to students in the EMCE program. Prerequisite: Grade

of “C” or higher in ENGL 110 or its equivalent.

ENGL 305 Modes of Writing (5)

 An online course in effective expository writing. Emphasis

on writing as a process. This course counts toward the Teacher

Preparation Programs in Liberal Studies and Child

Development but does not count toward the major or minor.

Prerequisite: Grade of B or higher in ENGL 110 or its

equivalent and upper-division standing. GWAR

ENGL 310 Advanced Writing (5)

 Comprehensive study of the techniques of effective expository

writing. Emphasis on development of prose style. Frequent

writing exercises, both in and out of class. This course counts

toward the Teacher Preparation Programs in Liberal Studies

and Child Development but does not count toward the major

or minor. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the equivalent and upperdivision

standing. GWAR

ENGL 311 Writing Literary Analysis (5)

 Intensive development of writing skills in English as a

discipline, specifically literary analysis and criticism. Students

practice writing about literature, nonfiction, and film using

basic principles of close reading, formalist attention to literary

techniques and structure, and appropriate critical approaches.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 235, 272, 290, 294, or 295, and upper

division standing. GWAR

ENGL/LING 319 Structure of English (5)

 Systematic examination of Modern English phonology,

morphology and syntax. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the

equivalent.

ENGL 320 Medieval English Literature: 450-1500 (5)

 English literature from the beginning to the close of the Middle

Ages. Old English poetry in translation, including Beowulf

and shorter poems; Middle English prose and poetry exclusive

of Chaucer, such as works of the Gawain poet, anonymous

lyrics, Malory; the beginnings of the English drama.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 325 Chaucer (5)

 Selections from The Canterbury Tales and shorter poems and/

or Troilus and Criseyde. Since the works are read in the

original Middle English, some attention is given to the nature

and development of the English language in the Middle Ages.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 330 Renaissance English Literature: 1500-1660 (5)

 Overview of the literary genres and generic developments of

the sixteenth- and early seventeenth century. Focusing upon

major writers such as Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Lanyer, Donne,

and Herbert this course explores the relationship between their

imaginative achievements and the literary, religious, and

political contexts in which these works were written and read.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 235, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 335 Shakespeare I (5)

 Introduction to Shakespeare’s literary and theatrical world

which may include lecture; discussion; video recordings; local

productions; analysis of themes, sources, language and other

traditional literary approaches; in-class acting exercises; and

selected performance aspects (such as blocking, staging,

costumes, and set design). Selected readings in the tragedies,

comedies, and histories. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 235, 272,

290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 336 Shakespeare II (5)

 Introduction to Shakespeare’s literary and theatrical world

which may include lecture; discussion; video recordings; local

productions; analysis of themes, sources, language and other

traditional literary approaches; in-class acting exercises; and

selected performance aspects (such as blocking, staging,

costumes, and set design). Selected readings in the tragedies,

comedies, and histories. Selections different from those read

in ENGL 335, which is not prerequisite. Prerequisite: ENGL

101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207,

208, 235, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 337 Milton (5)

 Study of Milton’s evolution as a writer in order to track the

various religious, political, and literary influences upon his

work. This study of Milton culminates in selected readings

from his greatest work, Paradise Lost. Prerequisite: ENGL

101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207,

208, 235, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 340 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English

Literature: 1660-1785 (5)

 Literature of Neoclassicism and of sensibility in England.

Satire, drama, poetry, the novel, the essay. Selected studies in

Dryden, Behn, Congreve, Finch, Swift, Pope, Montagu,

Addison and Steele, Richardson, Johnson, Gray, Cowper, and

others. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course

from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 350 Romantic English Literature: 1785-1837 (5)

 Literature of the “age of revolutions” in England. Selected

studies in Wollstonecraft, Blake, Smith, Wordsworth,

Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Byron, and others. Prerequisite:

ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205,

207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 351 Victorian English Literature: 1837-1901 (5)

 Studies in Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Dickens, the Pre-

Raphaelites, Wilde, and other major figures. Literature,

criticism, and social history. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295.

ENGL 360 Modern English Literature: 1901-1945 (5)

 Literature of the Edwardian and Georgian period in post-

Victorian England. The novel, drama, and poem as instruments

of artistic and social comment. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or

the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272,

290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 361 Contemporary English Literature: 1945 to the

Present (5)

 Literature of the post-World War II era of social and political

analysis and change. The novel, drama, and poem as

instruments of artistic and social comment. Prerequisite:

ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205,

207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 362 Literature as Mirror of Society: Studies in

Contemporary Fiction (5)

 Intensive critical examination of the major social themes and

ideas explored in major contemporary fiction. Texts chosen

from both Western and non-Western literatures. Application

of selected critical techniques to broaden understanding of

the themes integral to these great works of literature and

enhance the appreciation of literature in a broad context.

Prerequisites: Completion of General Education Areas A, B4,

and C and upper division status and ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295. This is a writing intensive class. GE T2

ENGL 363 Literature and Technology (5)

 A study of the relationships between literature, science, and

technology. Prerequisites: Completion of General Education

Areas A, B4, and C and upper division status and ENGL 101

or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208,

272, 290, 294, or 295. GE T2

ENGL 364 Studies in Fiction: The African-American

Experience (5)

 Intensive examination of African-American experience as

portrayed in fiction and critical essays using various critical

approaches (e.g., multicultural, postcolonial, mythological,

historical, and formalist). Such themes as slavery, alienation,

religion, and the triumph of the spirit will be explored. As we

discuss African-American experience in the selected fiction,

we will also be engaged in comparative analysis of the images

of Blacks presented in selected major non-Western literatures.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295. This is a writing

intensive class. GRE

ENGL 365 Literature of Slavery (5)

 Intensive, critical examination of slave literatures (novels,

short stories, poetry, and autobiography) using various

approaches, e.g., historicist, formalist, and multicultural. Such

themes as emancipation, identity formation, myths about

Africa, and images of Blacks are explored in works which

originate from such diverse sociopolitical and cultural

backgrounds as Africa, South America, England, America,

Cuba, and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: Completion of General

Education Areas A, B4, and C and upper division status and

ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205,

207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295. GE T2

ENGL 366 Ethnic Literatures (5)

 Intensive examination of the experiences of writers both in

the U.S. and abroad who are concerned with issues of race,

ethnicity, class, and gender in their fiction, non-fiction, and

poetry. Includes a range of writers, literary works, movements,

and contexts that represent diverse and often marginalized

cultural voices. Prerequisites: Completion of General

Education Areas A, B4, and C and upper division status and

ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205,

207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295. GE T2

ENGL 367 Queer Literature (5)

 Study of literature by and concerning queer persons (gay,

lesbian, bisexual, transsexual). Consideration of changing

gender identities in different periods and cultures; examination

of the connections between literary representation, culture,

and individual experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, 295.

ENGL 369 World Literature in English (5)

 Study of major English-language works written outside of

Britain and the United States in locations such as Africa,

Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Asia, and the

Caribbean. The course takes the form of a global survey or

else focuses on the literature of a single nation. Prerequisite:

ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205,

207, 208, 272, 290, 294, 295.

ENGL 370 Literature by Women of Color (5)

 Extensive examination of the experiences of women of color

both in the U.S. and abroad as portrayed in their fiction,

nonfiction, and poetry and as interpreted in feminist and ethnic

literary theory and criticism. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295. This is a writing intensive class. GRE

ENGL 372 Studies in Chicano Literature (5)

 Extensive examination of the experiences of Chicana and

Chicano writers as portrayed in their fiction, drama, poetry,

and film and as interpreted by current ethnic literary theory.

Course also includes study of the socio-cultural milieu from

which the literature emerged. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295.

ENGL 373 Women in Literature and Film (5)

 Study of the depiction of women in representative works of

literature and film, focusing on the perceptions of women

writers and film makers about roles, functions, and societal

expectations that influence women’s goals and self-concepts.

Prerequisites: Completion of General Education Areas A, B4,

and C and upper division status and ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295. This is a writing intensive class. GE T2

ENGL 374 Gender in Literature and Film (5)

 Investigation of gender identity as represented in literature

and film. This course examines what forces can be understood

as shaping gender (roles, functions, expectations) and what

may be perceived as inherent or natural to an individual

identity; addresses apparently changing identities in different

cultures and periods; considers connections between literary

and visual representation, gender, culture, and lived

experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one

course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, 295. GRE

ENGL 375 Studies in a Major Author or Group (5)

 Intensive study of the works of a single major author or of a

group of closely associated writers. Specific topic determined

by instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or

one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

May be repeated for different course content.

ENGL 380 Major American Authors: Beginnings to the

Civil War (5)

 Study of selected poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama from

the 1600s to 1865, with particular emphasis on major figures

and movements from the early and late colonial, early national,

and romantic periods. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295.

ENGL 381 Major American Authors: Civil War to World

War I (5)

 Study of selected poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama from

the Civil War to 1914, with particular emphasis on major

figures, as well as movements such as realism, naturalism,

and the literature of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 382 Major American Authors: Twentieth Century

to the Present (5)

 Study of selected poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama from

1900 to the present, with particular emphasis on major figures,

as well as movements such as late naturalism, modernism,

and postmodernism. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent

or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or

295.

ENGL 385 Literature of the American South (5)

 Literature of the ante-bellum and post-bellum South, focusing

on the distinctive features of southern culture as they appear

in major works of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. A

representative selection of works from the early nineteenth

century, the era of Reconstruction, and the modern period.

Special emphasis placed on the Southern Renaissance of the

twentieth century, with particular attention to the southern

gothic and southern grotesque, as well as to issues of cultural

decay and regeneration, racial tension, religion, and

psychological trauma. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295.

ENGL 386 Literature of the American West (5)

 Literature of the American borderlands, focusing primarily

on the evolving representations of the “wilderness,” the

“frontier,” and the “west.” A representative selection of fiction,

non-fiction, poetry, and drama from the age of exploration,

the Enlightenment period, and the nineteenth century. Special

emphasis placed on modern and contemporary writers from

the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Coast, with particular

attention to ethnic identify, western landscape, environmental

issues, and western mythology. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or

the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272,

290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 391 Bible as Literature (5)

 Extensive readings from both the Old and New Testaments

designed to prepare the student to recognize and understand

Biblical allusions in later European literature, to appreciate

the texts as literature, and also to show the differences between

ancient Hebrew rhetoric and our own. Prerequisite: ENGL

101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207,

208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 392 International Folk Narrative (5)

 Survey of the various genres of oral narratives and an

examination of their historical and social significance as well

as their influence on literature. Emphasis on studying the

universal motifs of folk narratives and contrasting the folk

narratives of different cultures. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or

the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272,

290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 393 World Mythology (5)

 Survey of the various kinds of mythical discourse throughout

the world and the changing nature of “myth” itself. The

recurrence of ancient myths in modern thought and literature

is stressed. Mythology of the Greeks and Romans is

emphasized as found in Homer, Virgil, and Ovid and other

Classical writers. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent

or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or

295.

ENGL 395 Writing Nature: Literature and the

Environment (5)

 Exploration of the intersection between literature and nature,

looking closely at such issues as literary interpretations of the

land, the imposition of cultural/ideological influences on the

representation of nature, narratives of exploration and

discovery, and the importance of gender, race, and ethnicity

in a literary relationship to nature. In addition to literary texts,

course readings may include essays, histories, diaries, letters,

film, and photographic collections. Prerequisites: Completion

of General Education Areas A, B4, and C and upper division

status and ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 235, 272, 290, 294, or 295. GE T2

ENGL 396 Gothic Worlds (5)

 Study of the late eighteenth-century literary movement known

as the “gothic revival” in England. During this period, authors

explored the darker themes of death, decay, fear, melancholy

and all manner of nightmarish scenarios. This course examines

the movement’s cultural origins as well as its widespread

popularity into the early nineteenth century and beyond.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 397 Selected Readings in Western and Non-Western

Literature I (5)

 Study of representative works of world literature from the

earliest literature to the 17th century. The course focuses on

the literary and cultural significance of selected great works

in Western and non-Western literary traditions. The broad

aim of the course is to highlight universal themes and to

identify the historical and cultural contexts that give specificity

to each work. ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course

from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 398 Selected Readings in Western and Non-Western

Literature II (5)

 Study of representative works of world literature from the

seventeenth century to the present. The course focuses on the

literary and cultural significance of selected great works in

Western and non-Western literary traditions, including works

by women and ethnic minorities. The broad aim of the course

is to highlight universal themes and to identify the historical

and cultural contexts that give specificity to each work. ENGL

101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207,

208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 404 Creative Writing (5)

 Experimental writing, investigation, and discussion of creative

writing and the creative process, with individual and group

analysis of student work. Course focuses on poetry, fiction,

or drama. ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 272,208, 290, 294, or 295. May be repeated

for different course content.

ENGL 409 Theories of Reading Literature (5)

 This course investigates reading theory and pedagogy for

secondary and higher education. The course also examines

the many ways students negotiate meaning while reading

difficult texts, literary and expository; consider various reading

strategies and the way these strategies affect student outcomes;

and addresses the role of reading in high school English and

college composition classes. The course is open only to

students in the English single-subject program and does not

satisfy the GWAR.

ENGL 410 Reading, Writing, and Speaking for Teachers

(5)

 This course teaches the concepts of good reading, writing,

and speaking, based on current research in the field, and then

helps students discover effective strategies for teaching these

related skills and concepts. It focuses primarily on expository

reading and writing, with some emphasis on adjusting different

purposes for communicating to specific audiences. This course

is required for all students who plan to teach English in

California secondary schools and does not satisfy the GWAR.

The course is open only to students in the English singlesubject

program.

ENGL/LING 411 Writing in a Second Language (5)

 Examination of second language writing as both a process

and a product. Considerable emphasis placed on grammatical

errors in writing and how to teach students to edit their own

writing within the process of writing. Prerequisite: ENGL/

LING 319 or 415 or its equivalent. ENGL/LING 418 is

recommended.

ENGL/LING 413 Morphology (5)

 Morphology is the branch of linguistics dealing with the

analysis of word structure. The course examines the common

word-formation processes of inflection, derivation, infixing,

compounding, and reduplication within the context of the

lexical, metrical, and prosodic theoretical approaches.

Emphasis is also placed on the interrelationship between

morphology, the lexicon, phonology, and syntax. Prerequisite:

ENGL/LING 319 or 414 or 415 or the equivalent.

ENGL/LING 414 History of the English Language (5)

 The development of English phonology, morphology, syntax,

spelling, and vocabulary from the Old English period to the

present. Prerequisites: Completion of General Education Areas

A, B4, and C and upper division status. GE T2

ENGL/LING 415 General Linguistics (5)

 Basic concepts, theories, and issues in the study of language,

with emphasis on the sound system, principles of word

formation, and the semantic and syntactic patterns of English.

Consideration is given to first and second language acquisition

and the relationship between language and culture.

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 or the equivalent.

ENGL/LING 416 Phonology (5)

 Theoretical analysis of phonetics and phonology including

distinctive features, patterns, systems, and processes of

language within the framework of current generative

phonological approach. Examples drawn from English and

other languages. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319 or 414 or 415

or the equivalent.

ENGL/LING 417 Syntax (5)

 Introduction to generative syntactic theory. Students learn to

draw tree diagrams and write transformation rules for

sentences according to Chomsky’s Aspects model. Toward

the end of the course, students learn the basic principles of

the Government-Binding model. There is a heavy emphasis

on analyzing syntactic data—some from languages other than

English. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319 or 414 or 415 or the

equivalent.

ENGL/LING 418 Second Language Acquisition (5)

 This class discusses the conscious and unconscious process

of learning a second language after the first language has

already been acquired, examines the influence of first language

acquisition on second language development, explores issues

in second language literacy, examines second language

assessment/testing techniques and syllabus design, and

explores the major theories which support second language

acquisition. Topics include cognitive, affective, and

sociocultural factors, interlanguage, the Critical Period

Hypothesis, Contrastive Analysis, error correction, simplified

input, and acculturation. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319 or

414 or 415 or the equivalent.

ENGL/LING 419 Interlanguage (5)

 Examination of the grammars of second language learners as

independent, yet systematic, language systems. Stress on how

interlanguages evolve over time and the roles of such factors

as language transfer, universal grammar, and markedness.

Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319 or 415 or the equivalent.

ENGL/LING 418 is recommended.

ENGL/LING 420 Sociolinguistics: Language, Society, and

Education (5)

 Examination of the relationship between language and such

social variables as sex, economic class, race, and ethnicity.

Topics include social dialects, linguistic stereotypes, codeswitching,

and the educational problems of language

minorities. A thorough linguistic comparison between one nonstandard

dialect and Standard American English is included.

Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319 or 414 or 415 or permission

of instructor. GRE

ENGL/LING 421 Semantics and Pragmatics (5)

 Semantics deals with word-level and sentence-level meaning,

while pragmatics is concerned with language use in different

contexts and the reasons speakers vary their language in

particular ways. Emphasis is placed on discovering how

semantic and pragmatic structure interfaces with syntax,

examining the systematic ways in which languages structure

and encode meaning in words, sentences, and longer stretches

of discourse. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319 or 414 or 415 or

the equivalent.

ENGL/LING 422 Historical Linguistics (5)

 Historical linguistics examines language change at different

levels, including phonological, morphological, syntactic,

semantic, and lexical change. The course also discusses such

concepts as language contact and borrowing, comparative

language reconstruction, language relatedness, and language

families. Examples are drawn from both Indo-European and

non-Indo-European languages. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319

or 414 or 415 or the equivalent.

ENGL 460 History of Film (5)

 An institutional, aesthetic, cultural and political history of

motion pictures from the pre-history of the medium to the

contemporary moment. Various national and cultural contexts

are considered. Cross-listed as COMM 460. Prerequisite:

ENGL 110 or the equivalent. This is a writing intensive class.

ENGL 469 Modern African Literature (5)

 Examination of the works of contemporary African writers.

Selected literary works of such authors as Chinua Achebe,

Wole Soyinka, and Yambo Ouologuem studied. Prerequisite:

ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205,

207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 470 Studies in Nineteenth-Century Children’s

Literature (5)

 Examination of nineteenth-century classics of children’s

literature. Works covered include texts by Lewis Carroll,

Frances Hodgson Burnett, and Robert Louis Stevenson and

texts within and outside the main Western tradition. This course

uses principles of literary criticism and analysis to examine

literature written for children but also addressed to adults. It

focuses on escapism versus realism, male versus female

authors, and the social and cultural contexts out of which

children’s literature evolved. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295.

ENGL 471 Studies in Twentieth-Century Children’s

Literature (5)

 Examination of twentieth-century classics of children’s

literature. Works covered include texts by L. Frank Baum, A.

A. Milne, C. S. Lewis, and J. R. R. Tolkien and texts within

and outside the main Western tradition. The course uses

principles of literary criticism and analysis to explore realism

and fantasy, social allegory, and the motif of the quest or

journey. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one

course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 472 The Young Adult Novel (5)

 This course considers works published for and about teenagers,

including Louisa M. Alcott’s Little Women, L. Montgomery’s

Anne of Green Gables, J. D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye,

and J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter. The course uses principles

of literary criticism and analysis to explore the Bildungsroman

techniques and elements of social satire found in nineteenthand

twentieth-century young adult fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL

101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207,

208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 473 Children’s Literature and International Myth,

Folk Tale, and Film (5)

 This course uses principles of literary criticism and analysis

to examine myths, folk tales, nursery rhymes, and films from

diverse countries and the ways in which they express and shape

collective values. Works covered include fairy tales, the oral

tradition, fables within and outside the Western tradition, and

international films. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent

or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or

295.

ENGL 475 Studies in Fiction (5)

 This course focusing on the historical development and formal

features of the novel and/or the short story. Specific works to

be determined by the instructor. Prerequisites Completion of

General Education Areas A, B4, and C and upper division

status and ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 235, 272, 290, 294, or 295. GE T2

ENGL 476 Poetry (5)

 Studies in the form, structure, and themes of poetry by poets

from around the world and across the centuries. Readings in

the criticism of poetry and practice in writing poetic analysis.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course from

ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

ENGL 477 Topics in Literature (5)

 Focused study of a particular theme or genre in literature.

Specific topic determined by instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL

101 or the equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207,

208, 272, 290, 294, or 295. May be repeated for different

course content.

ENGL 478 Drama (5)

 Studies in the form, structure, and of drama playwrights from

around the world and across the centuries. Readings in the

criticism of drama and practice in writing literary analysis of

plays. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or the equivalent or one course

from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290, 294, or 295.

HUM 479 Literature and the Other Arts (5)

 An interdisciplinary seminar in a selected topic, period, or

style that combines experience in a literary genre with a parallel

expression in another art such as painting, music, or film.

Extensive reading, independent and group research; lectures

and discussion. Carries credit in English, Art, or Performing

Arts. Prerequisite for English credit: ENGL 101 or the

equivalent or one course from ENGL 205, 207, 208, 272, 290,

294, or 295. Prior approval of the department needed for credit

in Art and Performing Arts.

ENGL 480 Advanced Technical Communication (5)

 Principles and practices of writing particular to science and

technology. Includes expanded definitions, technical

descriptions, process explanations, instruction pamphlets,

manuals, laboratory reports, proposals, and presentations.

Cross-listed as COMM 480. Prerequisite: COMM 304.

ENGL 481 Advanced Business Communication (5)

 Principles and practices of writing particular to business

administration, management, and marketing. Includes special

purpose letters (request, inquiry, claim, adjustment,

accommodation, sales, refusal, credit, collection, good will),

promotional literature, news releases, policy statements,

informal reports to stockholders, adaptation of the language

of contracts, guarantees, and warranties for customers with

no legal background. Cross-listed as COMM 481. Prerequisite:

COMM 304.

ENGL 489 Experiential Prior Learning (variable units)

 Evaluation and assessment of learning which has occurred as

a result of prior off-campus experience relevant to the

curriculum of the department. Requires complementary

academic study and/or documentation. Available by petition

only, on a credit/no credit basis. Not open to post-graduate

students. Interested students should contact the department

office.

ENGL 490 Senior Seminar (5)

 A capstone seminar concerned with the integration and

consideration of the English major. The course may explore

the nature of the discipline, the relationship of various courses

and traditions considered within the major, or other more

focused special topics such as an in-depth exploration of a

major author or group. The course will include an assignment

or assignments that assess the major as a whole. Prerequisites:

ENGL 300, and senior standing, and/or consent of instructor.

ENGL 491 Senior Seminar for Prospective Teachers (4)

 Designed for majors selecting the Credential Emphasis, this

course emphasizes the practice and development of writing

skills in English as a discipline, specifically literary analysis

and criticism, and may be focused on a special topic, author,

or group of authors. Students practice writing about literature,

nonfiction, and film using basic principles of close reading,

formalist attention to literary techniques and structure, and

appropriate critical approaches. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 and

senior standing and/or consent of the instructor.

ENGL/LING 492 Senior Seminar in Linguistics (4)

 Linguistics majors design and carry out their own research

projects under the supervision of the instructor. Each student

selects a branch of the discipline (phonology, morphology, or

syntax) as a basis to study a specific linguistic phenomenon.

Each student also chooses a language in which to analyze the

phenomenon. Projects may be theoretical or applied in nature.

Students begin by surveying the existing work on their chosen

phenomenon. Next they formulate and conduct their own

experiments. At the end of the term, each student submits a

long term paper covering the project. Prerequisite: Senior

standing.

ENGL 497 Cooperative Education (variable units)

 The Cooperative Education program offers a sponsored

learning experience in a work setting, integrated with a field

analysis seminar. The field experience is contracted by the

Cooperative Education office on an individual basis, subject

to approval by the department. The field experience, including

the seminar and reading assignments, is supervised by the

cooperative education coordinator and the faculty liaison (or

course instructor), working with the field supervisor. Students

are expected to enroll in the course for at least two quarters.

The determination of course credits, evaluation, and grading

are the responsibility of the departmental faculty. Offered on

a credit/no credit basis only.

ENGL 498 Directed Study in the Instruction of English

(variable units)

 Theory and method of undergraduate instruction in English.

Weekly meetings with faculty sponsor and supervised

experience which may include developing, administering, and

scoring examinations; leading small group discussions;

tutoring; and directing students in researching term papers.

Offered on a credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Consent

of instructor who will serve as the sponsor and approval by

chair of the Department of English.

ENGL 499 Individual Study (variable units)

 Special projects developed by the individual student in

consultation with the designated instructor. Admission with

consent of department chair.

GRADUATE COURSES

ENGL 500 Methods of Scholarly Research (3)

 The study of the nature and function of imaginative, expository,

and argumentative writing. The resources for scholarship in

composition and in literature and the problems of method in

the major areas of research in English. Must be taken as one

of the student’s first three graduate English courses.

ENGL 504 Approaches to the Analysis of Writing (5)

 A study of various linguistics approaches for analyzing the

structure of written texts.

ENGL 505 Rhetorical Theory (5)

 An introduction to recent research on written composition,

the most current theories of rhetoric, and the implications of

these theories for the teaching of writing.

ENGL 506 Composition Theory and Practice (5)

 Emphasis on the understanding of grammar, syntax, structure,

and form, in principle, as well as of the problems in

communicating effective and acceptable language usage in a

classroom situation.

ENGL 507 Writing in a Second Language (5)

 The writing process and the written products of people

composing in English as a foreign language. Topics of

discussion include contrastive rhetoric, error analysis, and

evaluation. Special is given to the writing problems of

international students learning English and to appropriate

instructional procedures helpful to such students.

ENGL 508 Teaching Basic Writers (5)

 This course includes both the traditional underpinnings and

the practical applications for teaching developmental writers

and addresses the diverse cultural, emotional, and academic

needs of these students.

ENGL 515 Theories of English Grammar (5)

 Study of the assumptions, systems, and applications of one or

more modern approaches to the English language. Prerequisite:

ENGL/LING 319 and 414 or equivalents.

ENGL 518 History of the English Language (5)

 Studies in the development of English phonology, morphology,

syntax, and vocabulary from the Old English period to the

present. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319 and 414 or

equivalents.

ENGL 525 Chaucer (5)

 Studies in The Canterbury Tales and/or Troilus and Criseyde,

and a selection of Chaucer’s shorter poems.

ENGL 533 Seventeenth-Century British Literature (5)

 Study of seventeenth-century poetry, prose, and/or drama.

(Note:  May be repeated with permission of advisor if different

course content.)

ENGL 535 Shakespeare (5)

 Study of selected plays. Prerequisite: ENGL 335 or 336 or

consent of the instructor.

ENGL 541 Eighteenth-Century British Literature (5)

 Study of eighteenth-century poetry, prose, and/or drama.

(Note:  May be repeated with permission of advisor if different

course content.)

ENGL 552 Nineteenth-Century British Literature (5)

 Study of nineteenth-century poetry, nonfiction prose, fiction,

and/or drama. (Note:  May be repeated with permission of

advisor if different course content.)

ENGL 564 Twentieth-Century Poetry (5)

 Survey of major British and American poets from about 1914

to the present. (Note:  May be repeated with permission of

advisor if different course content.)

ENGL 565 Postcolonial Literature (5)

 A study of literature produced in colonial and post-colonial

contexts. Course content will vary, in some cases focused on

the literature and culture of a single area or era.

ENGL 568 Modern British Novel (5)

 Survey of major British novelists since 1900. (Note:  May be

repeated with permission of advisor if different course

content.)

ENGL 570 Criticism (5)

 Problems in the application of critical methods in both

literature and language studies, with emphasis on the formation

and development of major trends in critical theory.

Prerequisite: ENGL 300 or equivalent.

ENGL 572 Poetry and Poetics (5)

 Study of selected poets, their works, and their poetics. (Note:

 May be repeated with permission of advisor if different course

content.)

ENGL 576 Development of the English Novel (5)

 Study of continuity and change in the structure and style of

the English novel and novella.

ENGL 578 Special Methods in the Instruction of Literature

(5)

 An introduction for graduate students intending to teach high

school or community college English, this course explores

the implications of modern literary theory for classroom

instruction of the literary text.

ENGL 580 Ethnic Literature (5)

 Study of American ethnic writers’ viewpoints and aesthetics.

Social and cultural contexts of the literature are studied. May

be repeated with permission of advisor when course content

changes, as in African-American Literature, Chicano

Literature, Asian-American Literature, etc.

ENGL 582 Early American Literature (5)

 Studies in American literature from the colonial Period to the

Civil War. (Note:  May be repeated with permission of advisor

if different course content.)

ENGL 583 Later Nineteenth-Century American Literature

(5)

 Studies in American literature from the Civil War to 1900.

(Note:  May be repeated with permission of advisor if different

course content.)

ENGL 584 Modern American Literature (5)

 Studies in twentieth-century American literature to WWII.

(Note:  May be repeated with permission of advisor if different

course content.)

ENGL 585 Contemporary American Literature (5)

 American literature since WWII. (Note:  May be repeated with

permission of advisor if different course content.)

ENGL 591 Theories of Second Language Acquisition (5)

 This class examines and compares the most recent and

influential theories of second language acquisition including

the monitor model, interlanguage theory, linguistic universals,

cognitive theory, and acculturation/pidginization theory. The

class applies towards the TESL Certificate, not towards the

MA in English. Prerequisite: ENGL/LING 319 or 415 or 420

or 515.

ENGL 600 English Practicum (3)

 A requirement for participation in the Teaching Assistant

Program in English, this course allows students to observe

and participate in the design and daily work of a college-level

writing class (at BC or at CSUB). Students will work with a

master teacher in and outside of class (inasmuch as we can

accommodate specific requests) and be responsible for some

independent work outside of class that is directly relevant to

the assigned course. Can be repeated for different course

content.

ENGL 690 Comprehensive Examination (3)

A comprehensive written examination on a reading list

covering major works in literature and composition. The

reading list is online. The examination is graded Credit/No

Credit and may be taken no more than two times. Prerequisite:

Classified status and successful completion of all other

graduate course work.

ENGL 691 Thesis (3)

A carefully designed study of a selected topic in literature,

linguistics, or composition. Emphasis placed on original

insights as contributions to graduate scholarship. Graded

Credit/No Credit. Prerequisites: Classified status and approval

of the student’s thesis committee.

ENGL 698 Directed Study in the Instruction of English

(variable units)

 Theory and methods in undergraduate and graduate instruction

in English. Weekly meetings with faculty sponsor and

supervised experience which may include developing,

administering, and scoring examinations; leading small group

discussions; tutoring; and directing students in researching

term papers. Offered on a credit/no credit basis only.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor who will serve as the

sponsor and approval by chair of the Department of English.

ENGL 699 Individual Study (variable units)

 Admission with consent of department chair.


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